7 Amazing Hoya Globulosa Care And Tips

hoya globulosa
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The hoya globulosa plant is a beautiful flowering plant that thrives in the warm climates of South America, such as Paraguay. It has been used for centuries by people to create natural remedies and teas. The hoya globulosa plant contains substances called hoya vinoids, which have antioxidant properties and help prevent inflammation.

Hoya globulosa is a hoya plant that can grow up to 8 feet tall. It has been used as an indoor plant since the 1800’s, and it thrives in high humidity environments with indirect light. The plant produces small, fragrant flowers that bloom from March through June.

Read more about this interesting plant and its propagation tips here!

Origin and description

hoya globulosa

Hoyas can be found growing in a wide range of environments. The origin location is the Philippines, Africa, Asia, Australia and other Pacific Islands. These amazing plants can grow in a variety of conditions and these factors make it an ideal indoor plant.

Hoya globulosa is one of the most popular hoyas, also known as ‘The Wax Plant’. It has glossy leaves with dense waxy bumps that are green underneath but appear white or pinkish-white from above. The foliage is similar to pea shoots. Hoyas produce small, white to pink flowers on pendulous stems that can reach three feet (one meter) in length under the right conditions; otherwise it stays shorter and bushier due to lack of space.

Hoya globulosa is an excellent houseplant because it requires very little light or water once established. It is a great choice for beginning indoor gardeners.

Hoya globulosa propagation

hoya globulosa

The hoya globulosa is a plant that can be propagated in several ways. It may grow from the leaves or flowers of mature plants, and it also grows well when potted into soil or water.

The hoya globulosa can grow into a large plant. For this reason, it is best grown in hanging pots or on trellises where the roots and leaves are not hidden by soil. When using water as the rooting medium for your hoya globulosa, fill an empty milk jug with moist potting mix to create a water reservoir that will feed into the soil below.

Hoya globulosa care

hoya globulosa

Hoya plants make great container plants, they like to be kept moist but not wet and love lots of sunlight. Hoya plants are slow-growing when you first get them; wait a few weeks before fertilizing your new plant! Remember that even if the leaves are drooping, hoyas are still thirsty.

The plant is a great indoor houseplant. This species of plants are native to Asia and Australia, so they love humidity. If you’re looking for an easy-to-care-for plant that can grow in low light conditions, this may be the one for you!

Light requirements

Hoya globulosa requires medium to high light levels. However, the intensity of the required lighting depends on your specific growing environment and location in which you are placing your plant. Therefore, it is important that you pay attention to what other growers are suggesting for their own plants when providing a recommendation about how much light this or any other type of hoya requires.

Soil/potting mix

In terms of soil, it is recommended that you use a potting mix with some perlite for this particular type. In addition to the perlite, you should also add in some additional components such as bark and sphagnum moss into your growing medium.

When preparing your own mixture from scratch, be sure that the final result has a pH between five and seven.

Watering

You should water your hoya globulosa plant once a week. The best way to do that is by immersing the whole pot in a bucket of room-temperature water for about 20 minutes. You can also use an irrigation system or even just pour some water on top of it, as long as it has enough drainage holes to let the excess drain out. Don’t forget to dump out any extra standing water afterwards!

The Hoya globulosa plant grows best when it is half-covered with distilled or purified water, which you should change at least once a week. Make sure that your hoya has enough light and warmth so that its leaves don’t turn yellow, and also so that the soil doesn’t dry out.

Fertilizer

Your hoya globulosa won’t need any fertilizer until after it has finished blooming. After that, you can give your plant a diluted liquid fertilizer once every two weeks during the spring and summer seasons. Reduce the frequency of feedings to just once per month during fall and winter months.

Some people prefer granular fertilizers for succulents and cacti, but liquid fertilizers are better for hoya globulosa plants. Make sure to use a fertilizer that has been specifically formulated for flowering or blooming houseplants, since these types of products have the nutrients your plant needs right now.

Temperature

Hoya globulosa can tolerate temperatures down to about 40˚ Fahrenheit, but it is best if they are kept above 50 degrees. If you keep your plant in a colder room with less sunlight, make sure that its leaves don’t turn yellow or brown.

If the temperature of your house drops below 45°F (about seven degrees Celsius), the plant will start to grow less and may even die. Make sure that it is getting enough light, warmth, and humidity so that its leaves don’t turn yellow or brown.

The Hoya globulosa Plant tends to be capable of tolerating a fairly broad range of temperatures; however, they do best between 50°F (about ten degrees Celsius) and 90°F (about 32°C).

Humidity

The hoya globulosa plant does best in a humid environment, so it is essential to mist the leaves of your Hoya at least once a day. You can do this by placing the pot on top of a shallow dish filled with water and pebbles or marbles. The evaporation from these objects will help raise humidity levels around your plant.

The plant is capable of tolerating a fairly broad range of humidity levels; however, during the winter months, it would benefit from high-level misting at least once per day to help it retain moisture and stay healthy.

An ideal humidity range is between 50 and 80%. If the humidity levels in your home are below 30%, you can use a humidifier to raise them.

Pruning

The Hoya globulosa plant will start to send out shoots from the base of its leaves. These offshoots can be removed and potted if they are a new variety or cultivar, but it is recommended that you leave them on your original plant so that it puts more energy into growing larger instead of producing seeds.

You should prune your hoya globulosa plant once every month or so to keep it short and bushy. You can use shears, pruning snips, or even just your fingers to do this. Make sure not to damage the main stem of your hoya when you are removing offshoots from its leaves!

When to repot

The best time to repot your hoya is in spring, just as it begins to show some signs of new growth. You can use a container that has drainage holes at the bottom or simply layer the soil with gravel or pebbles so that excess water drains out more quickly.

Hoya globulosa does better when potted in a larger container approximately every two years. The best time for repotting hoya globulosa is in springtime when it starts putting forth new shoots and leaves; however, it is possible to repot the plant at any time during its growing season. If you are using a standard pot without drainage holes, layer the soil with rocks or gravel so that excess water can drain quickly and efficiently from the container.

You should only need to repot your hoya globulosa once every two years; however, if it is in a container without drainage holes, you should layer the soil with rocks or gravel so that excess water can drain out more quickly.

Dormancy

Hoya globulosa will go dormant during the fall and winter months. During this time, you should stop watering your plant until its leaves begin to shrivel or curl up at its tips. Once new shoots appear in the springtime, start giving it more water again so that it can grow back into a lush green bush with lots of flowers.

Hoya globulosa’s “rest period” coincides with the colder, drier months of autumn and winter. During this time, you should stop watering your plant until its leaves begin to curl or dry up at their tips; however, if shoots appear in springtime, then start giving it more water again so that it can grow back into a lush green bush with lots of flowers.

If you keep your hoya globulosa indoors year-round, give it a period of dormancy by withholding water during the fall and winter months until its leaves begin to dry or curl at their edges.

Flowers & Fragrance

hoya globulosa

The flowers of the hoya globulosa plant are either white or light pink and come in clusters. Each flower is about one inch wide, has five petals, and has a scent that is similar to cotton candy!

Hoya globulosa produces small, sweet-smelling blossoms with four or five waxy petals each; these flowers begin as white or light pink and eventually fade to a creamy yellow when they age.

The flowers of the hoya plant are either white with five petals in clusters that are similar to cotton candy in scent! Each flower is about one inch wide, has waxy petals, and produces delicious scents that will fill your room.

Growth rate

Hoya globulosa is an easy plant to grow indoors that doesn’t require a lot of maintenance. It has dark, green leaves with unique markings on the underside and can reach heights of up to six feet tall when it is planted outdoors!

The hoya plant grows slowly but steadily indoors without requiring much care or attention; however, if you would like to make it grow faster you can feed it a dilute fertilizer every other week. In addition, the plant will reach heights of up to six feet tall if planted outdoors!

Toxicity

The sap of a hoya globulosa plant contains calcium oxalate crystals which can irritate the skin and eyes. If you have sensitive skin or reactions to poison ivy, then it’s best to wear rubber gloves while handling this plant!

If you happen to get any sap from a hoya globulosa on your hands or in your eyes, it’s best to wash the affected area with soap and cold water immediately. This plant contains calcium oxalate crystals which can cause irritation if they come in contact with your skin or eyes!

The sap of a hoya globulosa is toxic and should not be allowed to come into direct contact with human skin; however, this plant is not poisonous to pets. If you get any sap on your hands or in your eyes, wash the area immediately with soap and cold water!

USDA Hardiness Zones

The hoya globulosa plant is hardy in USDA zones 11 to 12.

The hoya plant can grow outdoors in the warmer parts of the United States (USDA zone 11-12) or indoors as long as it gets enough light and water.

Pests and diseases

Hoya globulosa plants are resistant to pests and diseases. Hoya globulosa plants are resistant to pests and diseases; however, if you over-water your plant it may develop root rot or other infections that can lead to its demise! Avoid watering the leaves of this plant but instead, soak its roots in a glass of water once a week for best results.

Conclusion

The hoya globulosa plant is easy to grow indoors without requiring much maintenance! If you want to make your hoya plant flourish, then feed it a dilute fertilizer every other week and keep an eye out for pests that may be hiding in its leaves.

If you’re looking for an attractive houseplant with unique markings on the underside of its leaves, then try growing a hoya globulosa indoors! This plant is easy to care for and can grow up to six feet tall if planted outdoors. Just feed it every other week with a dilute fertilizer and keep an eye out for pests that may be living in its leaves!


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