How Much Sun Do Succulents Need?

How much sun do succulents need
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How much sun do succulents need? The answer to this question is how much light they receive each day. In general, most succulents will survive in a wide range of lighting conditions from full shade to full sun. However, some succulents can only handle filtered or indirect sunlight. For indoor plants, it’s best to place them near a window that receives lots of natural light during the day and turn off any nearby artificial lights at night so they don’t get too hot.

Succulents are very popular plants because they require little maintenance and can withstand drought. However, how much sun do succulents need is a question that many people ask themselves when they buy their first succulents. It’s important to know how much sun your plant needs to grow effectively.

Succulents are often thought to be low maintenance plants, but how much sun do succulents need varies depending on the type. Some varieties of succulents will thrive in full sun while others require shade or partial sunlight.

We will discuss how much sunlight your plant should be receiving for optimal growth!

Do succulents need a lot of sun?

How much sun do succulents need

No. Most species are adapted to open, sunny climates with plenty of heat and light but not too much humidity or water around their roots. For this reason, succulents grow well in hot, sunny weather during the summer months if given enough sunlight. They do best with at least six hours of direct sun each day—more is better!

Succulents that prefer indirect light or shade are often referred to as “cactus” plants. These can be just as beautiful and rewarding to grow but require a little more attention than their full-sun counterparts.

How much sun do succulents need indoors?

If you’re growing succulents indoors, it’s important to think about which species will do best in your home. Many types of succulent houseplants require bright light with four or more hours of direct sunlight each day.

However, if the room where you plant is too dark for even a few minutes at a time (for example, you own a basement apartment with no window), your succulents will do best in an area where they’ll receive bright, indirect light most of the day.

If this is the case for you, try to position your plants as close as possible to a sunny window or skylight and keep them away from heat sources such as vents and radiators.

Be aware that succulents need bright light to grow their best indoors, but exposure to natural sunlight can cause bleaching or burning on the leaves of some species over time. If you’re growing a sun-loving type of plant, be careful not to let it get too hot at any point in the day. Even if your plant is used to bright, direct sunlight outdoors, it’s not a good idea to subject your succulents to scorching temperatures.

How much sun do succulents need outdoors?

How much sun do succulents need

As mentioned above, most succulents prefer lots of direct sunlight during the summer months when they’re actively growing. If you have an outdoor space with plenty of bright sunshine, try planting your favorite types in sunny locations where their roots can get at least six hours of sunlight per day.

When choosing a location for sun-loving succulents, avoid planting them in areas that are frequently shaded by trees, buildings, or other structures. This can be frustrating for you as a gardener if your plants do poorly every year due to the changing seasons instead of poor plant care!

Succulents growing outdoors naturally receive less light during winter months, especially if they’re placed far enough north where days are shorter and nights are longer. If you live in an area where the weather is cold for several months out of the year, it’s a good idea to take your plants inside before temperatures drop below freezing; this ensures they won’t be damaged by frost or receive too little light indoors over winter.

While many types of succulents can grow in full shade, it’s best to avoid this type of location because the plants will receive very little direct sunlight over their lifetimes. Having said that, there are some succulents (such as jade) that actually prefer partial shade and may grow poorly if grown in an area with too much sun. To be safe, try to find out which types are best suited for your living space before you bring any plants home.

Increasing lighting for succulents

If you think your plants aren’t getting enough light indoors, there are a few things you can try to increase their exposure.

First, move them closer to the source of bright sunlight—if possible, within just a foot or two (30–60 cm). You should see signs that they’re beginning to perk up and grow more quickly after a few days or weeks.

If this doesn’t work, you can invest in a special grow light to use near your plants for at least six hours each day (more is better). There are many different types of horticultural lamps available, specifically designed for succulents and other houseplants—look online or ask an expert which type would work best for you.

Another option is to install an additional window in the room where your succulents are growing so they can get more natural light throughout the day. This may be especially helpful during winter months when days are shorter and sunlight hours are fewer, but remember that, it’s important not to subject any plant type to too much direct sunlight at any time of year.

If you have a large collection of succulents, it’s important to consider how much space they need for their roots as well as the amount of sunlight that gets into your home on average. If you’re not sure whether or not there is enough light in your living space, talk with an expert about what types are best for you.

Can Succulents Get Too Much Sun?

How much sun do succulents need

 

Some succulents, such as certain types of cacti and echeveria species, require direct sunlight in order to thrive.

If you live in an area with very hot summers where temperatures above 85 degrees Fahrenheit (30°C) are common during the day, it’s best not to place these sun-lovers near windows or in rooms that receive a lot of reflected light from the sun. Doing so can cause leaves to turn yellow and shrivel up, which is usually an indication that your plants aren’t getting enough water (since they need less when their environment is bright and sunny).

Most succulents prefer bright but indirect sunlight at all times of the year; however, it’s a good idea to take them inside before temperatures drop below freezing in winter.

Succulents that prefer indirect sunlight include hen and chicks, living stones (Lithops), jade plants, echeveria species, kalanchoe blossfeldiana, string of pearls (Senecio rowleyanus), and many more.

Be sure to follow the specific care instructions when you purchase new succulents from a garden center or nursery since these details can vary depending on whether they’re desert types or prefer higher humidity levels in order to thrive indoors.

If your succulent appears wilted and discolored even though it’s been receiving plenty of water, this may be a sign that it’s been in the same spot for too long and needs to be moved around.

Some succulents can even benefit from being rotated every few weeks so their growth remains symmetrical! Just remember not to place them outdoors during colder months when temperatures drop below 50°F (or about 15°C).

Can succulents survive without sunlight?

Succulents can survive with just four or five hours of direct sunlight each day, but they won’t grow very quickly.

If you’ve brought succulents indoors during winter and notice that their leaves are much smaller than usual (or if the stems seem long and spindly), this is a sign that there isn’t enough light.

While succulents can survive with little light for months at a time, they won’t thrive without it. That’s why you should consider moving them closer to the source of bright sunlight—if possible, within just a foot or two (30–60 cm). You should see signs that they’re beginning to perk up and grow more quickly within a few weeks.

Some succulents, such as string of pearls (Senecio rowleyanus), actually need at least four or five hours of direct sunlight each day in order to thrive indoors—so make sure yours are getting enough!

If you live somewhere with prolonged periods of sun exposure year-round, these types can also be planted in small pots outdoors. Just make sure to protect them from the hottest part of the day during the summer months when temperatures are at their highest, and place them back indoors before nighttime falls in autumn/winter.

If your succulent is only receiving four or five hours of sunlight per day, it’s best to keep it in a south- or west-facing window where it can get the lightest possible.

Can succulents grow in the shade?

How much sun do succulents need

While some succulents, such as certain echeveria and graptopetalum species, prefer bright sunlight throughout the day in order to grow their best indoors, there are other types that can thrive even with less than four hours of direct light each day.

These include sedums (Sedum morganianum), some hens and chicks (Sempervivum spp.), blue chalk sticks (Senecio mandraliscae), aloe vera, haworthia fasciata, aeoniums species, senecio rowleyanus var. mikanioides, and more.

Even if your succulent is receiving less than four hours of direct sunlight each day—especially in a north- or east-facing window where it may only get indirect light—it’s still important to rotate it every few days in order to help them grow symmetrically! This will also prevent the growth from becoming lopsided over time.

Succulents can be placed outdoors during the summer months when temperatures are at their highest, but they should be brought back indoors before nighttime falls in autumn/winter. If you don’t want to keep your succulent outside all year long (especially if it’s too cold where you live), consider building a greenhouse or cold frame from a recycled window to help them thrive.

If your succulent is receiving less than four hours of sunlight per day, it’s best to keep it in a south- or west-facing window where it can get the lightest possible.

Conclusion

As you can see, succulents need a lot of sun. Most kinds prefer at least six hours of sunlight each day, but some will do fine with less. If they are indoors for the majority of their lives or if they have shaded spots in your garden where they get very little direct light, then it is likely that when you finally move them into the sun, they will need time to adjust.


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