Faucaria Tigrina Care “Tiger Jaw Succulent”

faucaria tigrina
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Faucaria tigrina, also known as the tiger jaw succulent, is a very unusual-looking succulent. It grows in the wild only in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa, and while it can grow to about 12 inches tall, it has a strange way of putting out new plants from its base – forming what looks like little “heads,” each with their own leaves, which will grow into their own plants.

In faucaria tigrina, the top leaves of a plant fall off to allow for this process, so if you have one with “heads” growing from it – don’t be surprised! The plant is also known as Cat’s Eye, Jade and Tiger Jaws.

Faucaria tigrina is an interesting-looking plant. It only grows in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa, and can grow to about 12 inches tall – but it has a strange way of putting out new plants from its base with what looks like little “heads.” Each one will grow into its own plant!

Origin and description

faucaria tigrina

Faucaria tigrina is a very unusual-looking succulent. It grows in the wild only in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa, and while it can grow to about 12 inches tall, it has a strange way of putting out new plants from its base – forming what looks like little “heads,” each with their own leaves, which will grow into their own plants.

In faucaria tigrina, the top leaves of a plant fall off to allow for this process, so if you have one with “heads” growing from it – don’t be surprised!

Faucaria tigrina is a species of plant in the Aizoaceae family. It grows as an evergreen perennial and has yellow flowers that bloom from August to September. It performs well in sandy, loamy soils with good drainage and prefers moist but not soggy soil conditions during its growing season.

Common names of the tiger jaw succulent 

The plant is commonly called Tiger Jaws, Cat’s Paws, or Shark’s Teeth. These names refer to the color of the leaves that are sometimes variegated with light green. The teeth along the edges are quite prominent and resemble those of a shark’s jaw.

Similar Species

Faucaria felina has a similar leaf pattern, but its leaves are larger and have a crinkled surface. Also, the flowers of Faucaria Felina appear in late summer (February to April). The inflorescence of Faucaria Felina is a panicle that forms at the axils of the leaves, whereas Faucaria tigrina has smaller racemes.

Faucaria tigrina propagation

faucaria tigrina

Faucaria tigrina is a very easy plant to grow from seed, and the plants will propagate themselves readily. It tends to form large clumps over time as older leaves die off, so these can be cut away at any point throughout the year for propagation. The easiest way of propagating them is to cut the leaves into sections and plant each section with some root growth. A gentle pull will reveal if it is ready for propagation or not.

If you are propagating faucaria tigrina succulents, remember that they will need a well-drained soil mix in order to thrive. Be sure your plants have enough space to grow, and that your substrate is well-drained.

If you are looking to propagate faucaria tigrina plants, remember that succulent propagation can be very simple or highly complex depending on the species in question. To start with, most plants will produce pups (offsets) at their base; these can simply be cut away and replanted.

Faucaria tigrina care

faucaria tigrina

Faucaria tigrina is quite a tough plant when it comes to caring, and in many cases will survive very happily without your direct interference. They tend not to need repotting often, as long as they are planted in a free-draining substrate with adequate space between the roots and the pot.

The plants are native to arid regions, so they can be left outside in the summer where temperatures fall below 24C. It also has thick tough leaves that protect it from both cold and sunburn. The plant will lose its leaves if exposed to prolonged periods of high humidity or frost.

Light requirements

Faucaria tigrina grows in full sun to partial shade. This succulent plant is quite tolerant of low light conditions and will grow indoors with bright, filtered sunlight through a window or under artificial lighting.

Soil/potting mix

Faucaria tigrina prefers well-drained soil. Use a gritty, fast-draining cactus mix or add pumice or perlite to regular potting soil to ensure good drainage.

The plant is easy to propagate from cuttings which will root in sandy soil with little water and bright light.

Watering

Water freely during the growing season from spring through fall. Reduce watering in winter to monthly or as needed to maintain slightly dry soil between waterings.

Fertilizer

Fertilize with a liquid cactus fertilizer monthly during the growing season. Suspend feeding in winter while the plant is dormant, and do not fertilize at all if temperatures drop below 40 degrees F (40 degrees C).

Temperature

Faucaria tigrina tolerates hot summer temperatures and is even drought tolerant. In USDA plant hardiness zone nine, the plant can take full sun all year round without suffering damage from late spring frosts that may occasionally occur in cooler parts of its range.

The ideal temperature range for the plant is 40 to 90 degrees F (40-90 degrees C).

Humidity

Faucaria tigrina is well-suited to indoor growing. Keep your plant out of drafts and away from heat vents or any other sources of hot air. The humidity level should be kept around 50%.

Pruning

Faucaria tigrina is an attractive plant that grows well in a small pot or large container. Its growing height of about 30 cm makes Faucaria tigrina to be suitable for use as a desk plant, even indoors. Faucaria tigrina offsets profusely and needs to be occasionally pruned. It can be trimmed during repotting and propagated by cutting off the shoots and planting them in fresh soil.

When to repot

Although Faucaria tigrina is not too fussy about the time of repotting, it is normally done after flowering, in early summer. Faucaria tigrina is a plant that can be repotted year-round.

Dormancy

During summer, Faucaria tigrina is dormant and not very demanding. In the winter months, when the plant has plenty of fresh soil and receives a little water weekly, it begins growing again.

Flowers & Fragrance

faucaria tigrina

Faucaria tigrina produces many offsets and occasionally small clusters of flowers, but not as profusely as Faucaria felina. The flower is a typical daisy-type flower and appears in mid-winter (July to August).

Growth rate

Faucaria tigrina is a small plant that grows slowly. It can be grown in a small pot or large container and will not outgrow its confines quickly.

Toxicity

All parts of Faucaria tigrina and its close relatives Faucaria felina and Faucaria subintegra are toxic. The plant contains saponins, chemicals that can cause stomach cramps, vomiting, and diarrhea if ingested.

USDA Hardiness Zones

Faucaria tigrina is hardy in USDA plant hardiness zones 9 through 11.

Pests and diseases

The Faucaria tigrina is generally a healthy plant. However, it may suffer from Mealybugs, Aphids, Snails, and slugs


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