Echeveria Topsy Turvy Succulent Care

echeveria topsy turvy
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Echeveria topsy turvy is a plant in the Crassulaceae family and a hybrid between Echeveria secunda and Echeveria gibbiflora, which are two species of succulent plants in the genus Echeveria.

Echeverias grow well indoors or outdoors as long as they have plenty of sunlight and drainage holes. They need loose, fast-draining soil. Echeverias require little maintenance and are drought tolerant.

A gardener can make their own Echeveria topsy turvy propagation material with succulent leaves, or purchase it from plant nurseries. The gardener should take cuttings where the stem meets the soil and cut off any excess roots that are in the way of the base of new plants.

Echeveria topsy turvy propagation

echeveria topsy turvy

Echeveria topsy turvy is a succulent plant that can be propagated by leaf cutting.

Echeveria topsy turvy propagation is easy. Simply take a cutting of an Echeveria topsy turvy plant and place it in wet soil with the leaves covered up, or use rooting hormone on the leaves if they are too sensitive for soil contact.

Echeveria propagation is done by removing offshoots or offsets from the base of an established plant, then potting it in sphagnum moss inside a small container. Unlike some other succulents that propagate through cuttings, echeverias can take root even without a leaf stem or node.

In order to help roots form, cover your propagating area (a pot or dish) with a plastic bag and place it in indirect sunlight. The Echeveria topsy turvy will form roots that can be planted into pots of soil, sphagnum moss, or cactus mix if you prefer when they are ready.

Echeverias propagate easily because they have a very specific leaf structure that makes it easy for them to grow new roots in any direction. The leaves are also very fleshy and can store water for a long time, which is why they don’t require much watering after being propagated.

Where to Store Echeveria Topsy Turvy Cuttings

Echeveria propagations should be stored in a refrigerator, or other cool places that is not frost-free. The cuttings may dry out if they are left in the sun and heat for too long, so it is important to make sure they are stored in a cool place.

How Long It Takes For Echeveria Cuttings To Root

echeveria topsy turvy

It only takes about three to four weeks for succulent cuttings of an Echeveria plant, with the exception of larger varieties like Echeveria x ‘Lauren’s Blue,’ which can take up to three months.

Echeveria cuttings should be watered regularly during this time period, but not too much or they will rot and die. The gardener may need a little help from the plant nurseries if their Echeveria propagations are larger varieties like ‘Lauren’s Blue’ because it will take longer for these cuttings to root.

Echeveria topsy turvy care

echeveria topsy turvy

Light requirements

Echeveria topsy turvy will grow well in medium light conditions. The more sunlight it gets, the faster and fuller of growth you’ll see with your plant. If grown in low-light conditions, Echeveria topsy turvy may not color at all or have a very subtle coloring that is hard to distinguish from the green leaves.

Low-light conditions can also cause slow growth rates, but it will not kill your plant or halt its progress altogether.

When grown in low-light conditions, Echeveria topsy turvy will need water more often. Be sure to check the soil for moisture levels every few days and provide enough light for your plant at all times.

If you find that your Echeveria topsy turvy is not coloring up as well, try adding a couple of hours of direct sunlight for a few days in a row.

Your plant will then be able to retain its color and grow strong!

Soil/potting mix requirements

Echeveria topsy turvy will grow well in any soil, but it prefers a wetter potting mix. It does not like sand or gravel because the water cannot be absorbed by those materials and they can lead to root rot. To prevent this from happening, make sure you have at least one inch of organic material (potting mix, peat moss) in the bottom of your pot.

Echeveria topsy turvy does not need a lot of water and will grow just fine with adequate drainage. However, it is important that you keep up with watering as needed so they do not dry out!

This can be accomplished by running an automatic drip system, leaving the top of your pot uncovered to allow for airflow and drainage, or by using a moisture-detecting mat.

Fertilizer requirements

Echeveria topsy turvy will need fertilizer once every three weeks. It is best to use a slow-release fertilizer that has been diluted with water so the plant does not get overfed or burned from too many nutrients. You can also add some compost if you want, but it’s not necessary for healthy growth.

Watering needs

Water your Echeveria topsy turvy every day if the soil has dried out. You can tell when it needs water because its leaves will start drooping or curling up and you’ll see brown leaf tips.

If this happens, simply give your plant a good drink of water from either your irrigation system or bucket and watch as it perks up and starts looking green again!

Echeveria topsy turvy does not need a lot of water and will grow just fine with adequate drainage. However, it is important that you keep up with watering as needed so they do not dry out!

Fertilizer

Echeveria topsy turvy will need fertilizer once every three weeks. It is best to use a slow-release fertilizer that has been diluted with water so the plant does not get overfed or burned from too many nutrients. You can also add some compost if you want, but it’s not necessary for healthy growth.

Temperature requirements

Echeveria topsy turvy will grow well in any temperature range.

However, the colder it gets outside, the more likely you are to see some browning or yellow leaves around your plant. This is due to insufficient light as a result of less sunlight during winter months and can be solved by moving your Echeveria topsy turvy near a window or adding some artificial light.

If you have already done this and the browning does not stop, try providing your plant with more water so it can maintain its full green color.

The ideal temperature range for Echeveria topsy turvy is between 18-24 degrees Celsius.

Humidity requirements

Echeveria topsy turvy will grow well in any humidity levels, as long as there is a lot of airflows.

If you have noticed the leaves turning brown at their tips or edges this could be due to lack of airflow and should be remedied by adjusting your plant’s pot so it can get more circulation, adding some artificial light, or opening the windows!

The normal humidity range for Echeveria topsy turvy is between 25% and 55%.

Pruning

It is important to prune every Echeveria topsy turvy plant about once a year. The best time for this would be in the spring, but it can also happen any time during the growing season as long as you are not cutting off more than 25% of your plant’s height and have good light levels.

Growth rate

Echeverias are plants that grow very slowly. If the conditions and potting soil are not optimal, it can take months or even years for them to form a flower spike on top of their rosette. The growth rate is one reason why they’re so popular among beginner gardeners: unlike some other succulents, there’s no need to worry about them not growing.

The echeveria topsy turvy’s main characteristic is that it grows on its side, rather than upright like most other succulents. It has the same growth rate as other Echeverias but doesn’t require any special care: just give it plenty of sun and water when needed, and it’ll grow.

Hardiness zone

Echeverias are one of the most popular succulents. They grow best in zones that receive full sun, such as those with a minimum temperature of around 20°C (68°F).

In general, they can tolerate periods of cooler weather but don’t do well if it drops below 15 degrees Celsius for more than a week or two. The Echeveria topsy turvy does best in zones 11 or 12 and can withstand a temperature of -22 degrees Celsius.

Toxicity

The echeveria topsy turvy is non-toxic. The leaves themselves might cause irritation if touched or cause a reaction for people with allergies, but they are not toxic in any other way.

Echeverias can sometimes have tiny hairs on the edges of their leaves, which will irritate some people’s skin when touching them. If you know this will bother you, it’s best to avoid these plants.

The leaves of the plant can cause contact dermatitis in sensitive individuals when handled or touched. The irritation is caused by oil-producing glands on both surfaces of the leaf – while most people are unaffected, some are more susceptible and may experience skin sensitization.

Pests and diseases

echeveria topsy turvy

Echeverias don’t tend to attract any major pest problems but can occasionally have issues with snails and slugs. These pests can be controlled by providing a container with some type of barrier, such as stones or sand at the bottom to prevent access to the soil.

Echeveria plants are susceptible to fungal infections if they’re not watered enough – but luckily these types of diseases are rare in well-draining potting soil. There are also some types of echeveria that can be susceptible to pests or diseases, but the Echeveria topsy turvy is not one of them.

The most common type of infection for succulent plants is a fungal disease caused by overwatering, which results in wilting and loss of leaves along with a slimy texture to the soil and plant. Fortunately, Echeveria plants are typically well-draining in their potting mediums and so this type of infection is rare.

Echeveria topsy turvy uses

Echeverias are used as groundcover, container plants, hanging plants, or potted on their own, so they’re a great option for those who have limited space but still want something attractive and low maintenance.


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