42 Stunningly Colorful Succulents for Your Garden

colorful succulents

If you’re looking to brighten up your garden, you’ll find that colorful succulents have a lot to offer! Succulents are distinctive plants that have adapted to dry climates by storing water in their leaves and stems. For this reason, they make great additions to xeriscapes or other low-water gardens and they can survive on rainfall alone. It’s no wonder these stunningly colorful plants are some of the most popular additions to any garden!

Succulents are all the rage right now, and there’s a reason they’re so popular – they’re stunningly beautiful! They’re also quite affordable, particularly when compared to other types of houseplants, and they require little upkeep once they’re set up in your home or garden.

So, if you want to add some color to your garden or just want to inject some life into your houseplants, succulents are the way to go. These durable plants have rounded, fleshy leaves that can be any color of the rainbow, making them ideal for almost any type of container.

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What are succulents?

colorful succulents

Succulents are plants that have thick, fleshy leaves that store water to help them survive long periods of drought or hot weather. There are more than 1,500 succulent species in the world, and they can be found just about everywhere from temperate regions to deserts, and to rainforests. Many succulents grow in brightly colored clusters that bring life and beauty to even the drabbest of gardens or yards

Succulents are gaining in popularity as the go-to plant because they are not only pretty, but low maintenance too! You can find these plants in homes, offices, and even schools all over the country, thanks to their unique texture and vibrant colors. It’s easy to see why succulents are so popular when you look at these 42 stunningly colorful succulents that will brighten up any garden or indoor space.!

Here are 42 beautiful colorful succulents

Euphorbia tirucalli (Sticks on Fire)

Euphorbia tirucalli (Sticks on Fire) - colorful succulents

These stunning colorful succulent branches are shaped like pieces of bamboo, but their true beauty lies in their bright red and orange blossoms. Bright flowers such as these not only make your garden pop, but they also help attract colorful birds to your yard! When planting Euphorbia tirucalli, be sure to place it in a sunny spot that’s protected from harsh weather.

Because they grow so quickly, they can quickly overtake surrounding plants if you don’t provide enough space between them. A full-sun location is best, although partial shade will suffice. Just keep in mind that plant growth will slow during cloudy days or when temperatures drop below 60 degrees Fahrenheit (15 degrees Celsius).

Also note that while watering once per week should be sufficient during warm months, watering twice per week is recommended during cooler months or when rainfall is scarce.

Graptosedum ‘California Sunset’ (Peachblossom)

Graptosedum ‘California Sunset’ (Peachblossom)

Graptosedum ‘California Sunset’ is a hybrid of Graptopetalum paraguayensis “Ghost Plant” and Sedum adolphii. Graptosedum (also known as ponytail palm) is a genus of monocotyledonous flowering plants. The name Graptosedum derives from Graptophyllum, which means ghost leaf in Greek and refers to an earlier species of Graptosedum.

They are not hardy in temperatures below 10 degrees Fahrenheit. In warm areas, they can be grown outdoors year-round. In cooler areas, they can be grown outdoors during the summer months. When growing indoors, it should be placed on a sunny windowsill with no direct sunlight. Water sparingly and only when the soil is dry to touch at least every two weeks.

Opuntia “Santa Rita” (Santa Rita Prickly Pear)

Opuntia “Santa Rita” (Santa Rita Prickly Pear) - colorful succulents

With its thick, colorful pads, Opuntia Santa Rita is a stunner whether it’s planted in clusters or as an accent. As a bonus, these cacti don’t need much watering and won’t attract bugs to your garden. These succulent plants grow well outdoors year-round in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 10 through 12 and are good for container gardens all year long. If you live in a cooler climate, they can be moved indoors during the winter months.

The bright colors on these prickly pears come from betalain pigments, the same pigments that give beets their deep red color. The more intense colors come from high concentrations of betacyanins, while lighter shades result from higher levels of betaxanthins. Both pigments are antioxidants that have been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties and may help protect against cancer development.

Blue Glow “Agave” (Agave attenuata x Agave ocahui)

Blue Glow “Agave” (Agave attenuata x Agave ocahui)

Growing from 6 inches to 4 feet tall, Agave attenuata x Agave ocahui Blue Glow produces gorgeous violet-blue flowers in spring. This succulent does best in full sun, though it can tolerate partial shade and will do fine with regular watering and thorough watering during dry spells. It has a wide, showy rosette of silver blue-green leaves that burnish bronze when grown in bright light. The plant’s flower stalk emerges after about three years of growth and reaches up to 3 feet high.

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The succulent grows well outdoors in USDA hardiness zones 9 through 11, where its tubular red or orange flowers are sure to draw attention. It is also suitable for growing indoors as a houseplant. The plant requires very little care once established; however, it needs more water than most other succulents if you want your Blue Glow Agave to thrive.

Crassula capitella (Campfire Plant)

Crassula capitella (Campfire Plant) - colorful succulents

If you’re looking to add some color to your garden with little effort, Crassula capitella is a good choice. These easy-to-grow colorful succulents plants require little maintenance, making them an excellent addition to any low-maintenance garden. It can survive in full sun or partial shade and prefers dry soil. It also makes a great houseplant if you don’t have room in your yard for it!

The Campfire Plant gets its name from its red flowers that resemble campfires when they bloom in early summer. You can propagate new plants by taking cuttings from mature plants, which will root easily in moist potting soil. You may even be able to find these succulent plants at local nurseries during their spring season.

Echeveria agavoides cv. Wine Red (Red Sirius)

Echeveria agavoides cv. Wine Red (Red Sirius)

The Echeveria genus includes approximately 70 species of rosette succulent plants. In addition to being beautiful, they’re quite diverse, including plants with both striped and spotted leaves, as well as varieties that have colorful leaves in shades of yellow, orange, and red. Echeveria agavoides cv. Wine Red (Red Sirius) is one such variety—with velvety wine-red hues and a speckled green body. The flowers are white.

This plant grows well indoors or outdoors. It requires bright light but not direct sunlight, so it’s perfect for sunny windowsills or an outdoor garden bed. Water when the soil feels dry to touch; overwatering can cause root rot and kill your plant. Fertilize monthly from spring through fall with a general-purpose fertilizer diluted by half at recommended rates, then reduce frequency during winter months when growth slows down.

Kalanchoe luciae (Paddle Plant)

Kalanchoe luciae (Paddle Plant) - colorful succulents

Kalanchoe luciae are one of those tropical plants that seem to be popping up everywhere. If you’re looking for a vibrant colored plant, then look no further. The paddle plant has bold green leaves and vivid pink flowers (when grown in bright light). In fact, their name comes from their resemblance to old-fashioned paddles used by canoers.

Their large flower petals curl upwards toward sunlight and pollinators. They grow well indoors or outdoors, but they will thrive best if given plenty of natural light. They are also easy to propagate so you can share them with friends or family!

Propagation is simple: just snip off a stem and stick it into some soil—that’s it!

You should see new growth within weeks. Paddle plants come in many colors including yellow, orange, red, and even purple. These colorful succulents make great gifts for teachers or anyone who loves gardening.

Aloe cameronii Hemsl (Red Aloe)

Aloe cameronii Hemsl (Red Aloe)

Aloe Cameronsii plants are colorful succulents that produce flowers in colors of red, orange, yellow, and purple. The Aloe Cameronsii tends to flower in late summer, typically during the fall months. This plant is often referred to as Red Aloe or Flame Aloe. To maintain the vibrant colors of your plant, it is better to avoid direct sunlight and give them a good amount of water through watering cans or drip irrigation systems.

The soil should be well-drained with added organic matter like peat moss, compost, or leaf mold. The potting medium should be 1 part loam, 1 part peat moss, and 1 part sand or perlite. It is also important to provide some shade from the hot afternoon sun if possible. If you live in a region where temperatures go below freezing it would be best to bring your plant indoors until springtime when you can return it outdoors again.

Senecio serpens (Blue Chalksticks)

Senecio serpens (Blue Chalksticks) - colorful succulents

Senecio serpens is a relative of succulents like Sedum, but it’s quite different in shape. A native of South Africa, Senecio serpens is a tall and spindly rosette that can reach up to six feet (1.8 meters) tall! The branches are twisted and tightly rolled. The leaves are thick and bluish-green with some variegation. In full sun, they turn more blue.

This is one of those rare succulents that look good even when they’re not blooming, the silvery-blue color looks great year-round. It makes an excellent accent plant or focal point in your garden. Give it plenty of space so you can enjoy its unique shape from afar as well as up close!

Echinocactus grusonii (Golden Barrel Cactus)

Echinocactus grusonii (Golden Barrel Cactus)

There’s nothing like a plant named Grusonii to convince you that it won’t make a good houseplant. That being said, Golden Barrel Cactus (Echinocactus grusonii) is a member of one of my favorite groups: The popular Echinocereus (or hedgehog cactus) group.

This particular species has been used as an ornamental in U.S. gardens since at least 1891 and is native to Mexico where it can be found growing in dry rocky areas at altitudes between 3,000 and 5,000 feet above sea level.

It’s not hardy enough for most U.S. climates, but if you live in USDA zones 8b or warmer and want a striking specimen plant for your garden, then Echinocactus grusonii may be just what you’re looking for. Not only does it have those gorgeous golden spines, it also produces bright yellow flowers during spring and summer.

Sempervivum tectorum var. Purple beauty (Purple Beauty)

Sempervivum tectorum var. Purple beauty (Purple Beauty) - colorful succulents

This succulent is a great addition to any succulent lover’s garden. The Sempervivum tectorum var. Purple beauty (Purple Beauty) produces red-purple leaves with white markings that look like polka dots when it is left out in sunlight.

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This plant can grow to about 3 inches tall and 15 inches wide, and does well in most sun conditions, but shade from noon until 2 p.m., depending on your climate zone. It requires little maintenance, making it a popular choice among succulent lovers. However, do not overwater or let the soil dry out completely between watering sessions.

Crassula ‘Baby’s Necklace’

Crassula ‘Baby’s Necklace’

This cactus is a cross of two succulents, Crassula perforata, better known as String of Buttons, and Crassula rupestris ssp. marnieriana.

The baby’s necklace succulent (Crassula ‘Baby’s Necklace’) is one of our favorite easy-care succulents. This shrub grows quickly and has sweet green leaves with a mildewed brown center that makes it a great focal point. The baby’s necklace can be pruned to keep its size in check, but due to its growth rate, do not expect immediate results.

We recommend using a pair of garden shears or hedge clippers to trim it back every three months or so. It will produce small white flowers if given enough sunlight. If you want your plant to flower more often, try increasing your lighting from about 10 hours per day to 14 hours per day during the summer months. Crassula ‘Baby’s Necklace’ prefers bright light and lots of water, especially when young.

Aloe x nobilis (Golden-toothed Aloe)

Aloe x nobilis (Golden-Toothed Aloe)

This particular succulent is a cross between Aloe marlothii and Aloe barberae, making it a hybrid in every sense of the word. Its succulent leaves range from solid yellow to orange with black striations, though you’ll find plenty of cultivars that are variegated or have other uncommon leaf colors.

It grows slowly and prefers bright light, but don’t place it in direct sunlight as it will burn easily. It also requires very little water once established (about 1/4 cup per week), so be sure to keep an eye on its soil if you forget! It can tolerate temperatures down to about 20 degrees Fahrenheit, but below that, you should bring it indoors until spring. If you’re interested in growing one of these yourself, just look up Aloe x nobilis seeds online; many sellers offer them!

Crassula ovata ‘Sunset’ (Sunset Jade)

Crassula ovata ‘Sunset’ (Sunset Jade) - colorful succulents

Also known as Jade Plant or friendship tree, Crassula ovata ‘Sunset’ is a hybrid succulent native to South Africa. Crassula ovata are best known for their thick, fleshy trunks and wide, sword-like leaves that resemble those of Aloe vera. Given adequate exposure to sunlight, they will produce an abundance of stunning pink flowers in spring and summer.

Hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 10 through 12, Sunset Jade can be propagated from cuttings. It prefers full sun and well-drained soil. If you live in USDA zone 9b or above, it may survive outdoors year-round.

If you live in a colder climate, bring your plants indoors before temperatures drop below freezing. Sunset Jade grows slowly but reaches heights of 3 feet tall with equal widths over time.

Phedimus spurius ‘Dragon’s Blood’

Phedimus spurius ‘Dragon’s Blood’

The Phedimus spurius ‘Dragon’s Blood’ succulent, which looks a bit like a cactus but is actually a different plant species entirely, produces deep-red leaves and spires of flowers in summer. This upright perennial does best in well-drained soil and lots of sunshine. It’s native to South Africa.  Also known as Dragon Tree or Dragon’s Blood Tree, it can grow up to 10 feet tall.

This stunning succulent is one of my favorites because its vibrant red color stands out against nearly any backdrop. Plus, it grows relatively quickly, in fact, it can reach heights of 12 feet or more if given enough time! If you want to keep your Dragon Tree small, be sure not to overwater it; let dry soil do its thing instead.

Sedum nussbaumerianum (Coppertone Stonecrop)

Sedum nussbaumerianum (Coppertone Stonecrop) - colorful succulents

Sedum nussbaumerianum, sometimes called Mexican stonecrop, grows to a height of six inches, with a spread of about three feet. It has pale yellow flowers and usually grows in limestone areas near trees. Its long, fleshy stems make it ideal for topiaries or container gardening.

If you want to cultivate sedum nussbaumerianum from seeds, start them indoors eight weeks before the last frost; plant them outdoors after all danger of frost has passed. Plant them in full sun or partial shade and keep their soil moist but not soggy. They need little care once established, but if they’re exposed to cold temperatures they may die back completely until spring arrives.

Echeveria ‘Morning Light’

Echeveria ‘Morning Light’

This Mexican succulent, also known as Hens and Chicks, grows best in sandy soils with a PH around 6.5. It’s perfect as an accent piece in your garden or as a container plant on your patio. When you’re feeling ambitious, propagate it by cutting off some of its offsets to start new plants in other areas of your yard!  To learn more about Echeveria ‘Morning Light’, click here.

Over 100 days of sun each year: Florida is home to more than 1,000 species of succulents, making it one of North America’s prime spots for growing these interesting plants.

Aeonium arboreum ‘Zwartkop’ (Black Beauty)

Aeonium arboreum ‘Zwartkop’ (Black Beauty)

Aeoniums are an attractive collection of succulent plants which are native to North Africa and Macaronesia. These plants are extremely easy to care for, surviving almost anywhere in warm, dry climates. Aeonium arboreum ‘Zwartkop’ is a particularly unique species of succulent, with dark green leaves and red tips.

This plant will thrive on any sunny windowsill or outdoors in your garden, so long as it receives plenty of sunlight and water. The flowers of these plants are small but bright pink, making them quite beautiful when planted alongside other flowering varieties.

Echeveria affinis ‘Black Knight’

Echeveria affinis ‘Black Knight’ - colorful succulents

A columnar succulent, Echeveria affinis ‘Black Knight’ is a gorgeous addition to any garden. Standing 6 feet tall, with deep green leaves that contrast dramatically with its dark purple center and pink edges. Plant it in full sun to light shade, and provide good drainage; its leaves are prone to rotting if they stay wet too long. This variety requires little maintenance and thrives even in poor soil conditions.

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One of my favorite varieties of Echeveria, I absolutely love Black Knight. It’s a fast-growing variety of echeveria (as you can see by comparing mine to another plant), with rich colors that just make me smile every time I look at them! It stays small enough not to be invasive, but has beautiful colors that pop against your background planting!

Echeveria ‘Chroma’

Echeveria ‘Chroma’

With striking colors that range from burnt orange to cobalt blue, Echeveria ‘Chroma’ is guaranteed to brighten up any garden. With its shallow roots and minimal care requirements, it’s also great for succulent enthusiasts who are just starting out or those on a budget.

All you need is to find a sunny spot and you can watch as it grows more colorful every year. It’s best to grow these in pots because they do not do well in freezing temperatures. So if you live in an area where temperatures fall below 50 degrees Fahrenheit (10 degrees Celsius), bring your plant inside during cold months.

Senecio haworthii (Senecio haworthii)

Senecio haworthii (Senecio haworthii)

This plant comes in a variety of sizes and colors, so whether you’re looking to add something small or tall to your garden, Senecio haworthii will fit into any space nicely. This succulent also won’t need much water since it thrives in arid conditions. To maintain maximum color, look to water these plants every two weeks during their growing season and once a month during their resting season.

Once mature, they can survive on rainfall alone. For those living in hot climates, consider moving them indoors during the hottest part of summer. If you do move them inside for an extended period of time, be sure to keep them out of direct sunlight as that can cause sunburns.

Graptosedum ‘Bronze’

Graptosedum ‘Bronze’

Aptly named, Graptosedum ‘Bronze’ features pale yellow leaves that exude a rich bronze hue in early fall. This succulent adapts well to many environments and thrives in full sun or partial shade, making it a versatile addition to any garden. It also makes an excellent houseplant if you want to bring some color indoors during the winter months.

This hardy plant is easy to care for and requires little maintenance. If you have trouble growing other succulents, consider adding Graptosedum ‘Bronze’ to your collection—it grows just as easily as most common houseplants!

Gymnocalycium mihanovichii (Moon Cactus)

Gymnocalycium mihanovichii (Moon Cactus) - colorful succulents

The Gymnocalycium mihanovichii (Moon Cactus) is one of several species of cacti with a bluish-green hue. The flowers have brilliant purple color and bloom at night. The interesting thing about cacti such as Gymnocalycium mihanovichii is that they can live to be more than 100 years old, which makes them much older than many trees! In fact, some scientists believe that cacti may be among Earth’s oldest living organisms.

Lithops (Living Stones)

Lithops (Living Stones)

One of a kind and uniquely colored, Lithops are one of my favorite succulent houseplants. They’re also super easy to grow indoors! You don’t need any special light or soil to keep them alive—just place them in an area with lots of sun and water lightly. What you may not know is that there are more than 200 species in South Africa and each species has a different color pattern. Even cooler? They all have their own names too!

Sempervivum tectorum (Houseleek succulent)

Sempervivum tectorum (Houseleek succulent)

With its distinct rosette of leaves, sempervivum tectorum is one of a number of sempervivums that are popular with gardeners. Also known as Hen and Chicks, it can be found in a variety of colors including yellow, white, red, and shades in between.

Sempervivum tectorum will grow anywhere there is partial shade or sun and does well in both desert environments and areas with cold winters.

It grows best when planted in soil that drains quickly and doesn’t hold water for long periods of time. When planting hens and chicks, space them at least two inches apart to allow proper air circulation around each plant. If you’re looking to add some color to your garden, consider adding these succulent plants.

Agave victoriae-reginae (Queen Victoria Agave)

Agave victoriae-reginae (Queen Victoria Agave)

Queen Victoria Agave is one of few species that can bloom indoors. The long-lasting, bright pink flowers will fill your home with a delicious scent. This versatile succulent grows well in both hot and humid environments. While it prefers bright light, it will survive in low light.

A soil mix composed of two parts loam to one part sand is recommended for optimal health. Queen Victoria Agave requires very little water or fertilizer to thrive, which makes it perfect for beginners!

Yucca Rostrata (Blue Beaked Yucca)

Yucca Rostrata (Blue Beaked Yucca)

For those who love vibrant blue tones in their garden, look no further than Yucca Rostrata. This deciduous succulent has a rosette shape and light green leaves that turn an opaque blue with hints of purple when they’re exposed to direct sunlight. While it may not be particularly durable, you can easily grow Yucca Rostrata indoors if you’re looking to have a touch of bright color in your home.

Bryophyllum Fedtschenkoi (Lavender Scallops)

Bryophyllum Fedtschenkoi (Lavender Scallops)

This succulent plant is one of our favorites in terms of looks and ease of care. It does best in a sunny location but can tolerate partial shade, and it’s a low-maintenance option as well, once established, it doesn’t need much water or fertilizer to look great.

Mangave ‘Macho Mocha’

Mangave ‘Macho Mocha’

Perfect for patios, balconies and container gardening, Mangave ‘Macho Mocha’ grows up to 12 inches tall and displays dark green foliage with dark red-purple tints.

These succulent plants thrive in drought conditions and can take a little neglect, but it’s best to water them once or twice per week when temperatures reach above 70 degrees Fahrenheit. Allow at least 6 hours of sunlight each day and keep your plant in an area that reaches about 50 to 60 degrees year-round.

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Aeonium ‘Sunburst’

Aeonium ‘Sunburst’

It will grow to a height of 8–10 inches and can reach a width of 18 inches. It is drought-tolerant, so it’s perfect for those hot summer days. The flowers are pinkish-red in color.

Overall, Aeonium ‘Sunburst’ is one of those succulent plants that brighten up any room with its amazing colors and textures. It makes a great statement piece in any outdoor space. This plant also attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. It has no known pests or diseases, but it does best in well-drained soil with regular watering during hot weather.

Tradescantia pallida ‘Purpurea’ (Purple Heart)

Tradescantia pallida ‘Purpurea’ (Purple Heart)

This colorful succulent is one of our personal favorites. It has an oblong, purple-pink to pinkish-purple leaf and also comes in white (Tradescantia pallida ‘Alba’). The plant grows well in partial shade or sun and only needs watering once a week if you are growing it outdoors.

Otherwise, it can be kept indoors as long as you give it plenty of natural light.

Echeveria subrigida ‘Fire and Ice’ (Red Edge Echeveria)

Echeveria subrigida ‘Fire and Ice’ (Red Edge Echeveria)

Echeveria subrigida ‘Fire and Ice’ is one of those flowering succulent plants that just look amazing. Even if you don’t know too much about them, you can see from first glance that these flowers are simply stunning. They can be used in mass plantings or as container plants, and they bring an abundance of color to any garden.

Haworthiopsis attenuata (Zebra Plant)

Haworthiopsis attenuata (Zebra Plant)

These South African succulents are technically not Haworthiopsis, but rather belong to their own genus and are often referred to as Zebra Plants.

They’re native to rocky outcrops and can be found in several colors: deep green with purple stripes; silvery-white with green stripes; dark purple with yellow stripes, and cream-colored flowers. These tiny plants are perfect for a rock garden or on a sunny windowsill.

Crassula capitella “Red Pagoda”

Crassula capitella “Red Pagoda”

Crassula capitella is a gorgeous succulent that you’ll find hard to believe isn’t red. Also known as Red Pagoda, Crassula capitella features oval-shaped leaves that are deep burgundy in color with splashes of bright green around their edges. Its stems are also relatively tall, making it an excellent focal point in your yard or garden.

This plant does well in full sun and can tolerate periods of drought. It can grow up to 2 feet tall and wide, so make sure you have plenty of room if you want to include it in your landscape design!

Echeveria ‘Cheyenne’ (Heart Succulent)

Echeveria ‘Cheyenne’ (Heart Succulent)

Echeveria are one of my favorites; they’re super easy to care for and come in a huge variety of shapes, sizes, and colors. ‘Cheyenne’ is my favorite, it’s red with pops of orange and green dots. You can also try its white relative, Echeveria ‘Afterglow’, or pink Echeveria ‘Twinkle.’ I recommend grouping these plants together, so you get an explosion of color when they bloom.

Echeveria ‘Briar Rose’

Echeveria ‘Briar Rose’

This perennial succulent has long, smooth, slightly-curved grey-green leaves edged in bright pink. The rosette can grow up to 4 across and is ideal for pots or hanging baskets.

Despite their delicate appearance, these plants are hardy and easy to grow indoors or out! Bright light and peaty soil will help them thrive. Give them a good soaking every 1-2 weeks, you may need to increase your watering schedule as you watch them grow bigger in no time!

Echeveria ‘Silveron Red’

Echeveria ‘Silveron Red’

This tender perennial succulent has broad, silver-green leaves with a stunning red stripe down its center. A slow grower that’s hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 10 and 11, Echeveria ‘Silveron Red’ is an excellent specimen plant in patio pots or mixed containers. Keep it indoors during winter and watch it flower in spring.

Aeonium ‘Voodoo’ (Giant Red Aeonium)

Aeonium ‘Voodoo’ (Giant Red Aeonium)

This one is no stranger to attention. Voodoo is a giant, bold and beautiful succulent that takes on reddish hues in its deep red leaves. If you’re looking to add some drama to your garden, look no further than Aeonium ‘Voodoo’ (Giant Red Aeonium). It grows fast, big and beautiful! The best part? Its striking color makes it a perfect companion plant to other colorful varieties of plants.

Sedeveria ‘Blue Elf’ (Happy Plant)

Sedeveria ‘Blue Elf’ (Happy Plant)

One of a handful of drought-tolerant succulents that comes in colors besides green, Sedeveria ‘Blue Elf’ is one of our favorite perennials. Evergreen and carefree, Sedeveria ‘Blue Elf’ flowers in spring with delicate white blossoms that spread a sweet fragrance. In midsummer, its leaves turn deep purple and persist into fall before dropping off to reveal attractive turquoise succulent stems.

Although it prefers partial shade, it will tolerate full sun once established. It also makes an excellent houseplant if you want to bring some color indoors during the winter months or when you’re away on vacation.

Echeveria ‘Pink Champagne’

Echeveria ‘Pink Champagne’

This gorgeous succulent is a beautiful shade of pastel pink and packs quite a visual punch when planted with its cousins. It grows best in full sun but can tolerate some light shade. In warmer areas, it does well outdoors year-round. Indoors, place it in an east- or west-facing window. It’s an easy-care succulent that doesn’t require much water, making it perfect for succulent newbies.

Sedum hispanicum ‘Blue Carpet’

Sedum hispanicum ‘Blue Carpet’

If you’re looking to add some striking texture and color to your garden, consider a plant with succulent leaves, like Sedum hispanicum ‘Blue Carpet.’ This slow-growing, purple-leaved succulent will spread across your garden bed with bright green stems that emerge from rocky soil at its base. The blue leaves are beautiful in full sun or dappled shade.