30 Popular Types Of Echeveria With Tips

types of echeveria
Help us spread the love

There are many types of echeveria that you can find in the succulent world. They come in a variety of colors and shapes, but they all have one thing in common: a blooming flower on top! Echeverias are easy to care for and there is no need for extensive knowledge about plant care.

Echeveria types are a diverse group of succulents and come in an array of colors. This article will help you learn about the types of echeveria, how to care for them properly, and where to buy these beautiful flowering succulents!

How to propagate echeveria

It’s relatively easy to propagate echeveria from leaf cuttings. Simply take an inch-long cutting of a young, unexpanded leaf and place it in a moist potting mix. Make sure the ends are well covered with soil for best results!

Make sure that you use well-drained media or else your echeveria will rot.

It’s also relatively easy to propagate echeveria from stem cuttings, too! Take a four-inch cutting and bury it in moist potting mix (again with well-covered ends). Once the root system is established, you can separate your new baby plant from its parent. Simply pull apart the two plants and pot the baby up in its own container.

Make sure to provide your cuttings with plenty of warmth, light, water (but never soggy soil!), nutrient-rich substrate, and humidity for best results!

How to care for echeveria

Echeverias are incredibly hardy and can survive in almost any environment. They have been known to last years without being watered, which means that you don’t always need to water them! However, they do still require some care if you want them to thrive. In the case of echeveria succulents, there is a little more to consider than water.

Echeveria succulent care is fairly simple, but there are a few things you should know before starting your echeverias in their new homes. The first thing that must be mentioned about caring for echeverias is how much sunlight they require. Echeveria plants need at least six hours of sunlight per day. This means that indoor succulent plants should be placed in an east or west-facing window, while outdoor echeverias need to be planted where they will receive the most sun throughout the entire day.

The next thing you must know about caring for echeveria is its temperature requirements. Echeveria plants can survive at almost any temperature, but they do need to be brought inside during colder temperatures. It is best to bring your echeveria plants indoors before the weather gets even slightly chilly so that you don’t shock them with sudden changes of temperature.

The final thing about echeveria plant care that must be discussed is their feeding requirements. Echeveria succulents are often grown in poor soil, which means that you will need to fertilize them regularly if you want them to grow big and strong.

There are many different types of echeveria available for sale today, but one of the most popular types of echeveria is the Strawberry Cactus variety because it’s so easy to grow.

30 types of Echeveria

This genus of flowering succulents, Echeveria, is related to Sedum which is considered crassulas. The most popular types of echeveria are the hens and chicks variety with their colorful blossoms that stand out in contrast among heart-shaped leaves.

Since this article covers 30 amazing types of echeveria, here is an overview of the most popular types for you to learn about.

Echeveria Perle Von Nurnberg

types of echeveria

Echeveria Perle Von Nurnberg is a species of flowering plant in the family Crassulaceae, native to Mexico and one of the most popular types of echeveria you can think of. It forms part of the Echeveria genus and has notable star-shaped rosette leaves with alternating colors that are attractive as well as drought-resistant. The flowers bloom during the summer months before the leaves fade in autumn.

Native Area: Central America

USDA Growing Zones: 10–11

Height: Up to 5 inches

Sun Exposure: Full, Partial

Temperature:  20 – 30 F

Watering: In spring to fall, water thoroughly and allow soil to dry before watering again. In the winter, cut back on the amount of water you give your plant. Avoid getting water into their crowns or they can rot. Make sure that the leaves don’t get wet when it rains as this increases the risk of them developing mold and other diseases.

Echeveria pelusida ‘Ebony’

types of echeveria

This Echeveria is a small succulent plant that grows slowly. It has silver-gray leaves and will flower in the summer months with rosy pink flowers. This variety of Echeveria can grow up to one foot tall, but it usually averages six inches across. While this type of Echeveria may be hard to find, it is well worth the search.

Native Area: Mexico

USDA hardiness zone: The types of Echeveria are hardy in zones eight through 11.

Height: 0.25-0.75 m

Width: 0.15–0.45 meters

Sun Exposure: Full sun or partial shade

Bloom Time: Summer months

Temperature: 40-50 degrees Fahrenheit

Watering: When the soil is completely dry, water Echeveria pelusida ‘Ebony deeply. Plant in a well-drained area with sandy or loamy soil and add compost before planting.

Graptoveria ‘Moonglow’

types of echeveria

This Echeveria species is a succulent plant that has long flowering stems with purple flowers. It makes an excellent potted plant because of its low growing habit and gray-green foliage. In some parts of the world, it can be hard to find as these types of Echeveria only grow to about six inches tall, so not many people try to grow it.

Native Area: South Africa

USDA hardiness zone: These types of echeveria are best for zones nine and ten because of their cold sensitivity. Usually, this type of Echeveria can handle temperatures as low as -20 degrees Fahrenheit but may need protection from the wind and snow during colder months.

Height: 0.15-0.30 m

Width: 0–0.20 meters

Sun Exposure: Full sun or partial shade

Bloom Time: Summer months only

Temperature: 40-50 degrees Fahrenheit

Watering: Water when the soil is dry and fertilizes occasionally with a commercial cactus fertilizer to keep this Echeveria looking its best.

Echeveria Rosea

types of echeveria

This variety of Echeveria is a creeping succulent with rosettes that are eight inches in diameter. The leaves on these types of echeveria are bluish-gray and it has flowers throughout the summer months which appear to be pinkish purple.

Native Area: Mexico

USDA hardiness zone: This plant is best for zones nine and ten because it is not cold hardy.

Height: 0.15–0.45 m

Width: 0-20 centimeters

Sun Exposure: Full sun or partial shade

Bloom Time: Summer months only

Temperature: 40-50 degrees Fahrenheit

Watering: Water when the soil has dried out completely.

Echeveria ‘Avocado’

types of echeveria

With purple flowers appearing in the summer, these types of echeveria have a slow-growing habit and small leaves that are silvery gray to burgundy with green edges. The plant itself will grow up two feet tall but only about six inches across, making it an excellent choice for those who want to add color and interest to the garden, but do not have a lot of space.

Native Area: Mexico

USDA hardiness zone: These types of echeveria thrive in zones eight through ten.

Height: 0-30 centimeters

Width: 0–20 centimeters

Sun Exposure: Full sun or partial shade

Bloom Time: Summer months

Temperature: 40-50 degrees Fahrenheit

Watering: Water when the soil is dry and fertilizes occasionally with a commercial cactus fertilizer to keep this Echeveria looking its best.

Echeveria ‘Blue’

types of echeveria

These types of echeveria have bluish-green leaves that have pink tips. The plant itself is small and can grow up to eight inches tall and eighteen inches wide. The pink tips on the leaves will turn red during colder months which makes this plant a great choice for those who enjoy growing succulents that change color with the seasons.

Native Area: Mexico

USDA hardiness zone: These types of echeveria thrives in zones eight through ten.

Height: 0–30 centimeters

Width: 0-18 inches wide and tall (growing up to one foot)

Sun Exposure: Full sun or partial shade

Bloom Time: Summer months only

Temperature: 40-50 degrees Fahrenheit, but may need protection from the wind and snow during colder months.

Watering: Water when the soil is dry and fertilizes occasionally with a commercial cactus fertilizer to keep this Echeveria looking its best.

Echeveria Miranda

types of echeveria

This variety of Echeveria is a creeping succulent with rosettes that are eight inches in diameter. The leaves on these types of echeveria are bluish-gray and it has flowers throughout the summer months which appear to be pinkish purple.

Native Area: Mexico

USDA hardiness zone: This plant is best for zones nine and ten because it is not cold hardy.

Height: 0-30 centimeters

Width: 0–20 centimeters

Sun Exposure: Full sun or partial shade

Bloom Time: Summer months only

Temperature: 40-50 degrees Fahrenheit, but may need protection from the wind and snow during colder months.

Watering: Water when the soil has dried out completely.

Echeveria purpusorum

types of echeveria

Echeveria purpusorum is a summer-flowering succulent native to Mexico. The plant has pale green leaves with pinkish tips and spherical rosettes that grow up to about four inches across. In spring, it produces bright coral flowers on long stalks. It may need regular pruning to maintain its mound shape.

Native Area: Mexico

Height and Width: up to 30 cm, 12 inches tall. Usually about 14-20cm wide.

Sun Exposure: full sun or partial shade

Soil: Well-drained, gritty soil; cacti and succulent potting mix work well.

Watering Needs: Water moderately during the growing season every few weeks. Less than average in wintertime

How to propagate? Plant offsets that have formed around the base of the mother plant after flowering are over.

Echeveria Compressicaulis

types of echeveria

Echeveria Compressicaulis is a summer-flowering succulent native to Mexico. The plant has blue-green leaves that form rosettes, and it produces bright coral flowers on long stalks in spring. It needs regular pruning to maintain its mound shape.

Native Area: Mexico

Height and Width: up to 30 cm, 12 inches tall. Usually about 14-20cm wide.

Sun Exposure: full sun or partial shade

Soil: Well-drained, gritty soil; cacti and succulent potting mix work well.

Watering Needs: Water moderately during the growing season every few weeks. Less than average in wintertime

How to Propagate? Plant offsets that have formed around the base of the mother plant after flowering are over.

Echeveria laui

types of echeveria

Echeveria laui is a beautiful flowering plant from Mexico. It grows to about six inches tall and wide, with blue-green leaves that have red tips as they mature. Echeveria laui can be propagated by separating offsets or seeds in springtime.

Native Area: Mexico

Watering: Water sparingly throughout the growing season. Allow soil to dry completely before watering again (about once a week or less). Reduce water in wintertime when light levels are low and temperatures cool.

Lighting: Bright, direct sunlight during summer; reduce amount of hours spent under the direct sun in wintertime when days become shorter.

Height and Width:  Grows to about six inches tall and wide.

Propagation: Divide offsets or seeds in springtime.

Sun exposure: Full sun in the summertime when days are longer. Reduce the number of hours spent under the direct sun in wintertime when days become shorter.

Soil Type: Cactus potting mix works well for most types of echeveria, but you can use a fast-draining cactus blend if your plant is particularly sensitive to being overwatered or if you find that your plant is a particularly slow grower.

Temperature: Keep soil temperature between 65 degrees Fahrenheit and 70 degrees Fahrenheit during the day, but no warmer than 50 degrees Fahrenheit at night.

Fertilizer: Fertilize sparingly in early springtime to encourage new growth. Do not fertilize when temperatures are consistently below 50 degrees Fahrenheit.

Pests and Diseases: Aphids, fungus gnats, mealybugs, scale insects

Echeveria Orion

types of echeveria

The Echeveria orion is a flowering plant that’s native to Mexico. It has many brightly colored flowers that are blue, red, and purple in color. The leaves on these types of echeveria grow either horizontally across the ground or vertically upward toward the sunlight. This type of Echeveria can be grown outdoors during warmer months however it has to be brought indoors during colder months.

Native Area: Mexico

Height: Up to three feet tall

Watering: In the summer, these types of echeveria need to be watered every one to two days. During colder months, it can go from once a week or even less depending on how much water is in the soil.

Flowering: The flowers are blue and pink with red tips that grow just at the top of the plant’s leaves.

Lighting: This plant can grow in full to partial sunlight. It should be kept out of the direct sun as the leaves could burn. If it’s grown indoors, a window with eastern or western exposure is preferred.

Temperature Requirements: These types of echeveria needs night temperatures above 55 degrees F and day temperatures between 65-75 degrees F.

What Type of Soil: The soil should be well-draining and made up of sandy loam with perlite or sand added for good drainage. If you’re planting it in pots then use a potting mix that’s specifically designed for succulents.

Propagation: This type can grow from seed, but it’s a slow process. The best way to propagate these types of echeveria is by taking cuttings from an adult plant and putting it in soil that has perlite added for good drainage.

Echeveria setosa

types of echeveria

The Echeveria setosa is native to Mexico. It has pretty pink flowers that grow in clusters near the top of the plant’s leaves during each season, but it does tend to flower more often in spring and summer than in winter or fall. Like many other types of echeveria, this type also grows best when planted outdoors in warm climates during the summer and brought indoors in cooler climates.

Native Area: Mexico

Flowering Season: Spring, Summer

Height: about 12 inches

Watering: Once a week

Lighting: Full, Partial Sun.

Echeveria setosa care: Put outdoors in warm climates during the summer and bring indoors in cooler climates. Echeveria is slow-growing but does tend to flower more often in spring and summer than in winter or fall.

Temperature Requirements: Warm.

Propagation: Propagation is usually done by division of clumps or taking leaf cuttings.

Echeveria Shaviana

types of echeveria

The Echeveria Shaviana is native to Mexico, but it has since been introduced into many other areas of the world. The plant grows best when planted outdoors in warm climates during the summer and brought indoors in cooler climates. It does take a little time for these types of echeveria to grow so be patient with it as it forms its roots.

Native Area: Mexico

Flowering Season: Spring, summer

Height: about 12 inches tall with a 15-inch spread.

Watering: Once a week to every other day in winter and daily during the summer.

Lighting Requirements: full sun or partial shade outdoors.

Temperature Requirements: Warm.

Propagation: Propagation is usually done by division of clumps or taking leaf cuttings.

Ruffled Echeveria

types of echeveria

The Ruffled Echeveria is a gorgeous plant with luscious leaves that are covered in an intricate pattern of serrated edges. These types of echeveria succulents have flowers similar to the Hens and Chicks, which means they grow small clusters on top of one another along stems. The bloom can be pink or white depending on the variety you choose.

Native Area: Mexico

Flowering Season: Summer

Height: Up to 12 inches

Light Requirement: Sun-Tolerant, so a southern exposure works best.

Watering: Water sparingly. Wait until the soil is dry to water again.

Hardiness zones: Zone: 11-12

Echeveria nodulosa

types of echeveria

Echeveria nodulosa is a species of flowering plant named after the 18th century Spanish botanist Atanasio Echeverría y Godoy. It is a succulent that can grow up to four inches tall and has rosettes that are about six centimeters in diameter. They bloom bright red flowers while their leaves are covered with white hairs.

Echeveria nodulosa is sometimes described as having scales on its leaves that give it a fine feel, like velvet or soft sandpaper. The colors of the flowers range from pink to red and even yellowish-orange in larger plants.

Native Area: Mexico

Flowering Season: Spring

Blooming Period: March to May.

Height: 0.15-0.60 m

Light Requirement: Full sun.

Soil Condition: Well-drained, gritty soil with plenty of grit mixed in the top few inches is ideal for growing this plant.

Water Requirement: Water regularly during spring and summer months to keep plants healthy but do not overwater as Echeveria nodulosa does not like wet feet. They are also drought tolerant.

Hardiness: USDA Zone – Cold hardy to 15 degrees Fahrenheit.

Temperature: Hardy to 15 degrees Fahrenheit.

Propagation: Seeds, offsets, and leaf cuttings are the easiest ways of propagating Echeveria nodulosa. It is best done in spring or summer when new growth begins on the plant. Remove offshoots by carefully cutting them away from the parent plant with a sharp knife being careful not to damage the roots of these new plants.

Echeveria ‘Jewel of Desert

types of echeveria

Echeveria ‘Jewel of Desert’ is a hybrid succulent plant with rosettes that are two inches tall and wide. The leaves grow to about one inch long and have color patterns in shades of gray, pink, and green with hints of yellow markings on the tips.

The flowers bloom from December through March or April depending on the climate of where they are grown and reach about two inches long. They start out green, then turn yellow as the flower matures before opening into a beautiful red-orange color with hints of purple on the tips.

Native Area: Mexico

Height: 0.30-0.60 meters.

Light Requirement: Full sun, with some shade in the hottest parts of summer if it is grown outside or under glass where temperatures are warmer than that which they can tolerate when growing outside during the hotter months of summertime.

Soil Condition: Well-drained gritty soil is best.

Water Requirement: Water regularly during spring and summer months to keep plants healthy but do not overwater as Echeveria ‘Jewel of Desert’ does not like wet feet, they are also drought tolerant.

Hardiness: USDA Zone – Cold hardy to 15 degrees Fahrenheit.

Temperature: Hardy to 15 degrees Fahrenheit.

Propagation: Seeds, offsets, and leaf cuttings are the easiest ways of propagating Echeveria ‘Jewel of Desert’. It is best done in spring or summer when new growth begins on the plant. Remove offshoots by carefully cutting them away from the parent plant with a sharp knife being careful not to damage the roots of these new plants.

These types of echeveria plants come in a variety of sizes, shapes, and colors.

Echeveria Black Prince

types of echeveria

Echeveria Black Prince is a succulent type plant. The flower has dark reddish-purple color and it blooms in the summer season. It is easy to care for and can grow in any type of soil.

USDA Growing Zones: All zones

Sunlight Requirement: Full sun to partial sun.

Watering Needs: Echeveria Black Prince is a succulent type plant so it doesn’t need much water to grow well. It needs good watering for the first two weeks after being planted until roots become established. Once the root system has been established, you can reduce the watering.

Soil Type: The plant needs well-draining soil that is rich in organic matter and contains less alkaline pH levels around the range of between six to seven. It can grow best with average water conditions but it doesn’t like wet feet either, so be careful not to overwater your plants because this will rot out roots or dilute the salt which causes a deficiency of potassium and magnesium.

Echeveria Black Prince can grow in full sun to partial shade but it may lose its color if you put it under direct sunlight for too long or if you don’t have enough light inside your house, then giving them some time outside will help strengthen their growth again.

Echeveria Topsy Turvy

types of echeveria

Echeveria Topsy Turvy is a succulent plant. These types of Echeveria have beautiful pinkish-red leaves that look like they are upside down or inside out. They grow up to two feet tall and one foot wide in nature but when you grow them indoors, then expect the height only to be about six inches tall.

USDA Growing Zones: 11

Sunlight: Full to partial sun

Watering Needs: It needs good watering for the first two weeks after being planted until roots become established, then reduce water once the root system has been established. You should only water it when the soil becomes dry at least one inch down from the surface level of potting mix.

Soil type: a cactus soil mix or succulent potting soil.

Plant Height: up to two feet tall and one foot wide

Leaf Shape: rosette leaves that look like they are upside down or inside out, pinkish-red in color with some green lines on the edges of the leaves

Echeveria derenbergii

types of echeveria

Echeveria derenbergii is also a succulent plant. These types of echeveria have beautiful green leaves with some stripes on them that look like they are upside down or inside out. It grows up to one foot tall and two feet wide in nature but when you grow it indoors then expect the height only to be about six inches tall.

USDA growing zones: 11a to 11b

Sunlight requirements: Full sun is needed for the best color in leaves. Not too much direct, hot sunlight that may burn the plant’s foliage. Give it an average temperature of 55 degrees Fahrenheit or higher if possible when growing indoors. If you live in a climate where temperatures go below freezing, then you will need to grow it indoors.

Tolerance for cold temperatures: Not tolerant of freezing weather, protect from frost and freezes. They can tolerate a light frost but not too much. If the temperature goes below 32 degrees Fahrenheit, then they may get killed or severely damaged by this type of weather condition, so take that into consideration when growing them outdoors.

Watering needs: Water regularly and avoid letting it dry out completely. Water about once a week but do not overwater or underwater this plant because that will kill them too.

Soil type: Very good for compost soil or cactus mix soil. The Echeveria derenbergii can tolerate other soils as long as they are well-draining and not overly moist because too much water will kill them, again avoid this by making sure the soil is very dry before watering it next time.

Propagation methods: This type of succulent plant can be propagated by division, cuttings, and seeds.

Pests or diseases to watch for: Aphids, mealybugs or scale insects are the most common pests that attack these types of echeveria so stay on top of them when growing indoors with a good insecticide but do not spray it all over because you will kill the plant.

Echeveria Dusty Rose

types of echeveria

Echeveria Dusty Rose is a small and compact succulent with rosy-pink, wavy leaves. It has thick stems that make it perfect for hanging baskets or in rock gardens. The flowers are pink and appear in springtime.

USDA growing zone: 11

Watering needs: This plant likes it dry between waterings and can even tolerate some dehydration. Water when the soil is completely dry to the touch, typically every two weeks or so during summertime. During wintertime you should increase watering slightly, water until about 50% of the soil has dried out.

Sunlight: prefers bright light, but not direct sunlight.

Soil type: Use a fast-draining cactus mix or very gritty soil.

Temperature: keep above 50°F (15°C) all year round; it will tolerate frost, but not for long periods of time.

Echeveria Elegans

types of echeveria

Echeveria elegans is also called the Hens and Chicks or Mexican Hat plant. These types of echeveria succulents have cascading rosettes that are blue-gray in color with pink tips. Echeveria elegans comes in many varieties, including ‘The Sierra Nevada’, which only grows to two inches tall; ‘Blue Curls’, whose rosettes curl tightly; and ‘Graptoveria Douglas Hauser’, which features rounded leaves with a blue-gray cast.

USDA planting zone:

Echeveria elegans is not winter-hardy and should be grown indoors when temperatures fall below 50 degrees F. This succulent can survive in USDA planting zones 11-24.

Sunlight requirement:

Echeveria elegans requires full sunlight or light afternoon shade to stay healthy. This succulent can tolerate a wide range of lighting conditions and will grow successfully in either, but needs at least four hours per day of direct sun, especially if grown indoors without a lot of natural light during winter months.

Watering needs:

Echeveria elegans grows well in dry, hot conditions and needs little watering once established. During the summer months, it should be watered thoroughly until water runs out of the bottom holes of the container then left to go almost completely dry before being watered again. This succulent has a low drought tolerance level but can survive long periods without much moisture.

Soil conditions:

Echeveria elegans grows best in sandy, well-drained soil. These types of succulent will grow successfully with other plants and is drought tolerant once established. Echeveria elegans needs full sunlight or light afternoon shade for optimal growth.

Plant Size:

Echeveria elegans reaches about 12 inches in height at maturity, but the plant can get larger with time. This type of plant does not need much pruning other than cutting off dead leaves to keep it looking healthy. Echeveria Elegans does not grow quickly, but this variety of succulents can add a pop of color to any garden.

Planting:

Like most types of echeveria succulent, Echeveria elegans are easily propagated by separating offsets from the mother plant. These types of echeveria can be grown in pots or planted directly into a garden bed with other plants for optimal growth and lots of colors.

Echeveria elegans thrives when it’s kept outdoors but does not like cold temperatures. This type of succulent is not winter-hardy and should be brought indoors to an area with indirect sunlight before the temperature drops below 50 degrees Fahrenheit or when nighttime temperatures are expected to drop below 40 degrees F for extended periods.

Echeveria Doris Taylor

types of echeveria

Echeveria Doris Taylor is a species of flowering plant in the genus Echeveria, native to Mexico. It has deep green leaves that grow slowly and require very minimal care. They are one of the more drought-tolerant types of echeveria as well.

USDA hardiness zones: Zones 11, 12, and 13

Bloom time/color: May – June (varies, depending on the climate)

Watering needs: Drought-tolerant; requires very little care. Echeveria plants thrive in sunny locations with well-drained soil, although they require infrequent watering and should be allowed to dry out between waterings.

Echeveria plant care: Bright light, little or no summer watering in coastal areas; otherwise very adaptable. The intense sunlight found near the beach may burn leaves of this echeveria so it should be protected from the strong afternoon sun.

Echeveria propagation: Propagates easily from leaf cuttings or stem tip cuttings; full sun to bright shade; low water.

Light requirements: Full sun to bright shade

Echeveria soil/pot size: Requires well-drained potting media, although they are adaptable. They need more frequent watering in summer than winter after the plant is established.

Fertilizer needs: Requires little fertilizer.

Soil type: Fertile, well-drained soil.

Potting/repotting: Use a coarse potting mix with extra perlite or sand for good drainage.

Echeveria Neon Breakers

types of echeveria

Echeveria Neon Breakers is great for beginner gardeners because they are hardy and easy to care for. They can survive with low light but will thrive in bright sunlight. With proper watering habits, Echeverias can last a long time, sometimes even decades!

Echeveria Neon Breakers, also called Mexican Firecrackers or Sunset Rose, are wonderful types of echeveria. They have vibrant green leaves with red tips that make them stand out in any container garden. Echeverias are succulent cacti native to Mexico and the Southern United States.

Soil type: Well-drained soil, but can handle poor soils as well.

Watering needs: Keep soil moist, but not soggy.

Lighting needs: Echeverias prefer bright sunlight to partial shade. The more light the plant gets, the better it will look – though they can still survive with low-light conditions as well!

Spacing needs: Keep about one inch between plants so there is room for airflow and light.

Fertilizing needs: Fertilize once a month with a general-purpose fertilizer to help strengthen growth and reduce leaf drop from over-fertilization.

When to repot: Echeverias will produce pups or offsets around the base of the plant that can be cut off and replanted after three or four years. Once your plant starts to outgrow its pot and the soil gets dry an inch down, it’s time for repotting!

When to propagate: Propagate in early spring when new growth begins by pruning off offsets from around the base of the parent plant and replanting them in their own container.

Echeveria Tippy Toes

types of echeveria

Echeveria Tippy Toes is one of the best types of echeveria that you can buy. It has beautiful pink-red color with a green edge on its leaves and it also grows slowly, making this plant very easy to maintain. Because of its slow growth, this plant is also perfect for your dish garden.

Light: Tippy Toes Echeveria can do well under bright light. But it should be protected from direct sunlight as the leaves are prone to sunburns. If you want to grow them outdoors, make sure they are in a place where they will get morning or filtered shade during the summer months.

Watering needs: Tippy Toes Echeveria is a drought-tolerant plant which means it does not need a lot of water. But, when the potting mix dries out completely in between watering and you notice its leaves begin to curl upwards, this leaf has reached a critical point where root rot might start developing if overwatered.

Soil: Echeveria Tippy Toes grows fine in any type of standard cactus and succulent potting mix. It also does well in a coarse sand or perlite mixture (at least 50% of each).

Temperature: Normal room temperature is the best. Keep it above 15°C/59°F.

Propagation: This plant can be propagated by leaf cuttings or stem cuttings with some roots attached to them. Whichever method you choose, make sure the cutting is planted in a cactus mix with a high sand or perlite content.

Echeveria Afterglow

types of echeveria

Echeveria Afterglow is a succulent plant species in the genus Echeveria. It is also known as Mexican Snowballs, and has been called Hens and Chicks (a name used for many genera of rosulate eudicots).

USDA planting zone: USDA planting zone 14-16.

Light needs: Low to medium light needs.

Watering: It is a good idea to let the soil dry out between watering, and then water deeply until it starts draining from the holes in pot bottom.

Fertilizer: Fertilizers are not necessary for this plant if grown outdoors or in high lighting conditions indoors. If growing Echeveria indoors in low light, use a fertilizer with micronutrients periodically.

Propagation: It is propagated by cuttings or offsets.

Spacing: They need to be spaced about 12 inches apart from each other when grown as a groundcover plant. When planted as a succulent accent, they can go much closer together, and still look nice.

Soil type: Grow them in rich, well-draining soil.

Plant Size: The plant itself will grow to about 12 inches wide if grown as an accent or groundcover succulent. If it is planted closely together, they will form one large mound of foliage for the space between their stems.

Echeveria Blue Atoll

types of echeveria

Echeveria Blue Atoll is a small variety of Echeveria, which has been growing in popularity. These types of echeveria succulent plants can be found as blue-gray with pink tips to the leaves, and they grow from rosettes about six inches across.

Sunlight requirements: Full sun to partial shade

Watering frequency and amount: Keep soil moist but not wet. Water more frequently in summer, less in winter. Watch for signs of over-watering such as rotting roots or leaves falling off the stem. Over-watering can result in flowers dropping off.

Temperature requirements: Average room temperature (60-75° F) or warmer

Soil type: Regular succulent plant soil or cactus mix

Pot size: Start with a small pot and transplant to larger pots as the roots become too large. Allow room for growth, which can be up to one foot across for this variety of Echeveria.

Fertilizer requirements: Fertilize every two weeks during the spring and summer with diluted liquid fertilizer.

Pruning requirements: Remove dead leaves to keep the plant neat and clean, but avoid cutting the fleshy stems or flowers as this can cause rot.

Propagation method: Propagate Echeveria Blue Atoll by dividing offshoots from an adult clump in spring or fall when it is actively growing.

Common pests and diseases: Aphids, mealybugs, and scale insects can be troublesome if they attack young plants or stressed adults.

USDA hardiness zone: USDA hard-zone 11 – 12. This plant is not cold tolerant but will do fine in USDA zone 11, if it has to live outdoors during the summer months. It can be grown indoors too.

Echeveria agavoides

types of echeveria

Echeveria agavoides is a species of Echeveria. It has an apple green color, and it can grow up to two inches in diameter as well as five centimeters tall. The leaves of these types of echeveria are short-stemmed with acuminate tips that surround the rosette center, which stays compact until flowering season occurs. It is found in the Mexican state of Nuevo Leon, at an elevation of about 2000 meters.

USDA hardiness zone: Zone 11

How to Grow Echeveria agavoides:

Echeveria agavoides are tolerant of heat, sunlight, and drought. Like most succulent plants, it can handle occasional neglect but will reward you for the effort with greater beauty. They are not suited for cold climates. Despite being desert dwellers, they will not tolerate poor drainage or drought. They are best grown in containers with well-draining soil and should only be watered during the hotter months of summer when they will need more water than other succulents, which is approximately once a week to every ten days.

Watering needs: Water when dry, but not excessively.

Light: In summer it can handle full sun in a place that is protected from the hot afternoon sun and cold night temperatures. In winter it prefers to be in a cool spot with bright light or partial shade where there might still be some morning sunlight. It will drop its leaves if moved suddenly from direct to low light, as it tries to adjust.

Soil type: Cactus potting mix, or any well-draining soil mixed with gravel and sand.

Repotting: If potted in a good quality compost it may be necessary to re-pot every couple of years as the compost will wear out quickly. Many growers prefer not to bother with this necessity and allow their echeverias to grow in the same container for many years.

Echeveria peacockii

types of echeveria

Echeveria peacockii are types of echeveria plants that are native to Mexico. They have pale blue-green leaves with red edges and pink flowers in summer.

USDA hardiness zone:   Zone 11

Watering needs:  Water when soil is dry to the touch

Flowering: Pink flowers in summer.

Light needs: Full sun or part shade outdoors, bright light indoors.

Soil type: Well-drained soil, or a cacti/succulent mix.

Echeveria ‘Lola’

types of echeveria

Echeveria ‘Lola’ is a popular cultivar of the genus Echeveria. These types of echeveria produce rosettes up to five inches in diameter, with leaves that are greenish-gold and silver marbled or streaked. The flowers bloom on long stalks during winter months; they grow four to six inches tall and produce clusters of bright red to orange flowers.

USDA hardiness zone: Generally hardy to zone 11.

Temperature: Echeveria ‘Lola’ can tolerate a minimum temperature of -30°F and a maximum temperature of 95°F.

Lighting needs: Echeveria ‘Lola’ will do best in bright light, like direct sunlight or partial shade outside.

Watering needs: Moderate water during the growing season, little or no water in winter months.

Soil type: cactus mix, or regular potting soil mixed with sand.

Fertilization: Echeveria ‘Lola’ should be fertilized once every two weeks during the spring and summer growing season, using either liquid fertilizer or slow-release pellets. For best results, fertilize this succulent in the morning.

Echeveria ‘Lola’ is easy to care for plant that can be used as a colorful addition to any garden or home decor arrangement. Echeveria is native plants of Mexico and Central America where they grow among rocks, on cliffsides, and in dry pine forests. Most types of echeveria prefer bright sunlight, but a few varieties can tolerate some shade.


Help us spread the love