25 Amazing Birds With Red Beaks

birds with red beaks

Some birds with red beaks can sometimes also have orange or yellow beaks as well! First of all, you should know that there are many different species of birds in the world and their beaks come in all shapes and sizes. You can find long thin beaks, short thick beaks, pointed beaks, curved beaks, and even some that are flat or slightly bent upwards or downwards.

When it comes to birds, we tend to focus on the colors of their feathers, their songs, and the way they fly from tree to tree. But did you know that some birds have red beaks? If you’re looking for an alternative to black or white that will really stand out, consider having birds with red beaks as your next pet project or home décor piece.

Here are 25 amazing birds with red beaks!

birds with red beaks

Some birds with red beaks can sometimes also have orange or yellow beaks as well! First of all, you should know that there are many different species of birds in the world and their beaks come in all shapes and sizes. You can find long thin beaks, short thick beaks, pointed beaks, curved beaks, and even some that are flat or slightly bent upwards or downwards.

When it comes to birds, we tend to focus on the colors of their feathers, their songs, and the way they fly from tree to tree. But did you know that some birds have red beaks? If you’re looking for an alternative to black or white that will really stand out, consider having birds with red beaks as your next pet project or home décor piece.

Here are 25 amazing birds with red beaks!

Contents

Birds with red beaks

Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)

Birds With Red Beaks

Northern Cardinals are a beautiful shade of red, but they are not the only birds with this characteristic. A number of other gorgeous species have red beaks as well. The Northern Cardinal is one of the most well-known species in North America, known for its bright red plumage.

It can be found across North America east of the Rocky Mountains and south, to the Mexican states of Veracruz and San Luis Potosí. The males are very territorial during the breeding season and will even use their sharp beaks to attack intruders. They feed on seeds, berries, fruits, nectar, and insects.

Wood duck (Aix sponsa)

birds with red beaks

The Wood Duck, Aix sponsa, is a medium-sized dabbling duck with long red and brown bills. Unlike other ducks, they’re not diving ducks and mostly stay on the water’s surface. They’re herbivores and eat a variety of plants.

They usually come to shore at dusk to sleep. Male wood ducks are polygamous while females are monogamous so they can be quite territorial during mating season. The female lays her eggs in tree cavities lined with downy feathers.

Birds With Red Beaks

Red beaks can be attributed to a variety of factors. In the case of birds, red pigments are often a sign of sexual maturity or physical health. For example, in the red-billed curassow (Crax blumenbachii), the male’s flashy coloration shows he is physically fit and ready to reproduce.

Females often select their mates based on their hue, which has helped this bird thrive in Costa Rica where it is most often found. While many other species are threatened by human activity, the red-billed curassow thrives due to its ability to live in almost any habitat.

The next time you’re strolling through your local zoo or park, keep an eye out for these colorful birds!

Tufted puffin (Fratercula cirrhata)

birds with red beaks

The tufted puffin is a diving bird native to the North Pacific Ocean. These sea birds spend most of their time in the water and can be found in southern Alaska, Russia, and all throughout Japan. Though they are primarily found in water, they also live on coastal cliffs with nesting sites too steep for other seabirds to reach.

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They have bright red bills which help them find food, but this has earned them the nickname clowns of the sea because they look so goofy. They mainly eat small fish and krill (shrimp-like crustaceans).

Common Gallinule (Gallinula galeata)

Birds With Red Beaks

The Common Gallinule is a type of water bird that lives near and around freshwater habitats. They feed on plant materials and small aquatic invertebrates that they spot in the water.

The females have brown, white, black, and red coloring while the males are darker with a chestnut-colored beak. The breeding season lasts from April to July, and they build their nests close to lakes or ponds. One species (Gallinula chloropus) has an egg-shaped body and uses its feet for swimming!

White Ibis (Eudocimus albus)

birds with red beaks

The White Ibis is a bird found in the New World and it’s known for its beautiful, red beak. Their feathers come in many colors such as white, pinkish brown, gray, or gray-blue. There are three populations of White Ibis found throughout the world: North America; Southern South America; and eastern Australia.

In North America, the White Ibis can be found from Mexico to Canada. They live in wetlands, marshes, and lakesides where they feed on earthworms and other invertebrates. In Europe, Asia Minor, Africa, and the Middle East, this species can also be found but with different names. For example, it is called Angoura in Turkey and Oyuki in Japan which translates to red-billed.

Red-billed chough (Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax)

birds with red beaks

A beautiful bird with a long beak, the red-billed chough is endemic to the high mountains of northern Africa and Eurasia. The red-billed chough is small for a corvid, with females averaging about 20% smaller than males. Females are more slender and glossy in appearance than males, but there are no discernible plumage differences between genders.

They have blackish backs and wings speckled with white. They also have a dark hood which helps them blend into their surroundings.

Their diet consists mainly of invertebrates like insects, snails, worms, spiders, and scorpions as well as berries and other fruit when available; they also eat small mammals if they can catch them.

American Oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus)

Birds With Red Beaks

The American Oystercatcher is a large, stocky shorebird with a long, thick red beak that can be found on the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of North America. It typically nests in rock crevices or under tree roots and has to go down to the sea each day to catch its food.

Other birds have longer legs than it does so it uses their powerful bill to smash open shellfish and oysters, clams, mussels, and cockles which make up much of their diet.

In winter when there is no hard-shelled prey it will eat marine worms, snails, and crustaceans instead. They spend most of their time at the seashore but are also known to fly inland along rivers and lakeshores where they feed on fish eggs, larvae, and other aquatic creatures living near the surface.

Purple Gallinule (Porphyrio martinica)

Birds With Red Beaks

The Purple Gallinule is a member of the rail family, and it can be found in wetlands across Central and South America. They typically have red bills that are used to spearfish. It is not considered a threatened species because it lives near water in rural areas, but it could become threatened if the destruction of its habitat continues.

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Common Merganser (Mergus merganser)

Birds With Red Beaks

Common Mergansers are waterfowl found in North America. They inhabit freshwater lakes, streams, and ponds as well as saltwater bays and estuaries. They have red beaks, white faces with black eyerings, and a black collar around their neck.

They feed on fish including catfish, carp, mullet, and bass which they hunt by standing still on the water’s surface and then diving headfirst into the water at speed when they spot their prey.

Red-billed teal (Anas erythrorhyncha)

Red-billed teal (Anas erythrorhyncha)

The red-billed teal is one of the most colorful ducks in North America. The male is chestnut brown with a dusky breast and buff eyebrow, while the female has a richer brown coloration with some purple tones. They are found in wetlands, grasslands, and marshlands.

They live by riverside vegetation or wet meadows where they eat plants and insects. When they take flight, they seem to be leaving a fiery trail behind them due to their pinkish-white underparts. They also have orange patches on their head which can vary in size depending on the season. It takes three years for them to mature before they start mating and raising their own young.

Their habitats include marshes, swamps, wooded streamsides, and more rarely near lakeshores and other water bodies throughout much of eastern North America.

Buff-bellied Hummingbird (Amazilia yucatanensis)

Birds With Red Beaks

The Buff-bellied Hummingbird is a small bird that weighs 2.5 ounces on average and has a long tail that can be as long as 6 inches. They live in large groups and are migratory, traveling up to 2,000 miles per year to spend their winters in Central America and to breed in southern Texas.

Their primary food source is nectar, so they like to stop at all the different flowers they come across while they migrate. When other hummingbirds feed from one flower, the Buff-bellied Hummingbird will often feed from three or four flowers simultaneously. They have an amazing ability to hover and can fly backward as well as forwards – it’s just incredible!

Laughing Gull (Leucophaeus atricilla)

Birds With Red Beaks

The Laughing Gull is a coastal bird found along the Atlantic, Pacific, and Gulf of Mexico coasts of North America. They are a common bird in California, Washington, Oregon, and Canada. You can find them on beaches, near water and on islands. These birds are non-migratory so they stay near their nesting site all year round.

Laughing gulls typically live 10 to 12 years but some have been known to live up to 20 years old! These birds were given their name because they emit a high-pitched call that sounds like laughter.

Red-billed oxpecker (Buphagus erythrorhynchus)

Birds With Red Beaks

The red-billed oxpecker, also known as the Malagasy oxpecker, is a rare and endangered bird that only lives in Madagascar. Its habitat consists of lowland semi-deciduous rainforests with high tree densities. The red-billed oxpecker does not build nests and instead lays eggs in the holes of other animals such as rodents or roosting birds.

There are a number of potential threats to this species including habitat destruction and human predation. Studies have found that this species is negatively impacted by human activities like logging.

Broad-billed Hummingbird (Cynanthus latirostris)

Birds With Red Beaks

One of the many fascinating species of hummingbirds found in Central America is the Broad-billed Hummingbird. These birds have a long and broad beak, which they use to hover in front of flowers and reach down deep into flowers for nectar. For that reason, they are often referred to as bee hummers or honey hummers.

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When they feed, they hold their wings at a 45-degree angle so that the wind won’t blow them away from their food source. They also fly with one wing flapping on each side simultaneously, unlike other hummingbirds. They can produce up to 100 wing beats per second!

Long-tailed finch (Poephila acuticauda)

Birds With Red Beaks

The long-tailed finch (Poephila acuticauda) is a species of passerine bird in the family Estrildidae. It is found across mainland Australia and Tasmania, as well as Macquarie Island.

The male is predominantly black with a bright red beak, while the female has brown upper parts with yellow underparts. Juveniles are similar to females but have white underparts and grey streaks on their backs. They nest either high up in trees or rock crevices, laying two eggs that hatch after 11 days. They mainly eat insects such as beetles and caterpillars.

Black Skimmer (Rynchops niger)

Birds With Red Beaks

The black skimmer is a small shorebird with a red beak, which it uses to hunt for fish. The beak looks curved when viewed from the side and the tip of the beak points downwards. It has a long skinny tail and short, yellow legs.

Black Skimmers live in tidal estuaries, mudflats, marshes, and shallow waters on coastlines around much of the world. They are able to swim underwater as well as fly through the air so they can catch their prey.

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)

Birds With Red Beaks

The Mute Swan is one of the most threatened swan species in the world, with a population decline of 95% over the last century. Despite this decline, they are not yet listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List. They feed primarily on algae that grow underwater in freshwater lakes and rivers.

Swans form pairs for life and stay together year-round defending their territories from other birds and mammals such as geese, otters, and foxes. In the wild, these birds will only fly at night to avoid predators during the day. When flying at night, they can cover long distances to find food or mates.

Caspian Tern (Hydroprogne caspia)

Caspian Tern (Hydroprogne caspia)

Caspian Terns are migratory birds found in the northern hemisphere. They migrate from the arctic to sub-tropical and tropical climates every year. The Caspian Tern is small, weighing about half a pound and reaching up to 16 inches in length. One of the defining features of this bird is its red beak which helps distinguish it from other gulls and terns.

They get their name from the large body of water, the Caspian Sea where they were first observed. Their primary diet consists of fish that they catch by diving into the ocean’s surface or skimming the surface with their webbed feet. In order to hunt successfully, these birds have very good eyesight and hearing as well as special feathers that make them more buoyant in water.

Black Oystercatcher (Haematopus bachmani)

Birds With Red Beaks

The Black Oystercatcher is a migratory species that reside in North America and Mexico. The key identifying feature of this bird is its distinctive red beak, hence the Latin name Haematopus bachmani which translates to baptized with blood.

Their habitat includes rocky shores, cliffs, and in some cases inland freshwater lakes. These birds mainly eat shellfish found at low tide, but will also eat some small fish and insects as well.

Red-billed tropicbird (Phaethon aethereus)

Red-billed tropicbird (Phaethon aethereus)

Red-billed tropicbirds are large birds of the tropics, up to 51 inches long. Males have a red beak, but females don’t. Tropicbirds get their name from the fact that they will fly along the edge of a subtropical zone, such as Antarctica or the Indian Ocean.

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They use warm updrafts and ocean currents for assistance in their flight. Tropicbirds often follow fishing boats to catch flying fish and other food that may come their way.

Western Swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio)

birds with red beaks

The Western Swamphen is a member of the rail family and is also known as a Purple Swamphen or African Purple Moorhen. It has a purple/reddish/brown plumage with dark blue/purple-black wings, red legs and beaks, a white throat, a greenish tinge on the back, and yellow eyes.

They are found throughout Europe in freshwater wetlands with reeds. This species mainly eats seeds from grasses. Sometimes they will eat small invertebrates such as mollusks and insects. They will typically spend most of their time near water. If there is no water nearby, they will use their long bill to dig through mud to find food. Their eggs are cream-colored and speckled brown or black spots.

Common Tern (Sterna Hirundo)

Birds With Red Beaks

This small, abundant bird is found in temperate and subtropical regions. The Common Tern has a red beak and specializes in eating fish, shrimp, insects, and crustaceans. This bird nests near the water’s edge or on cliffs or offshore rocks to avoid terrestrial predators like large snakes.

In addition, they are known for their distinctive aerial displays of dipping, tumbling, and rolling in flight. They will also perform elaborate ceremonies with other members of their species, such as flying high into the air and then stooping back down again.

They can even change color from white to black while they’re at it! If you want to see these amazing birds up close, visit one of America’s great coastal reserves like Coronado National Memorial.

European goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis)

Birds With Red Beaks

The European goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis) is a small, highly gregarious songbird. There are both red and yellow goldfinches. They have an average life span of 3-5 years in the wild. These birds have a bright and bold color scheme that may be used to ward off predators or to signify territory to other goldfinches.

One interesting fact about these birds is their tendency to put all of their eggs in one basket. That means that if one egg breaks, the rest will die too. In winter they’ll form large flocks and migrate south together as a protection against cold weather. Like many other songbirds, they rely on insects for food which they catch by flycatching near the ground.

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator)

birds with red beaks

One of the most common examples of a bird with a red beak is the red-breasted merganser, which can also be found as far south as Brazil. These birds are no longer hunted for their meat and feathers but have thrived after getting a conservation status from Least Concern to Stable.

They’re skilled swimmers and feed on fish, tadpoles, and crustaceans that live in the water. They’re about 25 inches long with a wingspan of nearly 4 feet. The species’ name ‘serrator’ comes from its serrated bill, which it uses to tear apart prey before swallowing it whole.

Inca tern (Larosterna inca)

Birds With Red Beaks

The Inca tern, or Larosterna inca, is found in the tropical and subtropical regions of Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Chile, and Argentina. The Inca tern is a member of the tern family (family Laridae) that has red feathers at its beak.

It lays one egg at a time on ground nests lined with vegetation. Inca terns eat invertebrates such as crabs and other marine organisms. These birds feed their young by regurgitating fish onto their stomachs. The female incubates the eggs for about 24 days before they hatch. They are most active during the early morning and late afternoon.