Best 20 Shade Tolerant Succulents

shade tolerant succulents
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Keeping shade tolerant succulents can be a great way to add some color and variety to your garden. These plants are perfect for people who have shade in their yard, or just want something beautiful that doesn’t need much light.

Are you looking for shade tolerant succulents? If so, then look no further!

Here are the 20 best shade tolerant succulents that will thrive in the shade and produce beautiful blooms year-round.

20 best shade tolerant succulents

Christmas cactus (Schlumbergera bridgesii)

shade tolerant succulents

As one of the best shade tolerant succulents, christmas cactus is a popular holiday plant, but it doesn’t stop there. It’s actually one of the easiest succulents to grow indoors and it can even survive outdoors in warm climates with protection from full sun during the hottest part of the day.

The Christmas Cactus blooms reliably indoors around Christmas time when these drought-tolerant plants are watered sparingly. It’s also a great plant for beginners because it rarely suffers from pest or disease problems and can even go weeks at a time without any water.

Caring for Christmas cactus is relatively simple, too: Place the potted succulent in bright light near an eastern-facing window where temperatures don’t drop below 55 degrees Fahrenheit. Water the plant when the soil feels dry to your touch and feed it with a quarter-strength houseplant fertilizer every other week or so during the spring and summer months.

Snake Plant (or mother-in-law’s tongue)

shade tolerant succulents

The snake plant is also one of the popular shade tolerant succulents but it can be surprisingly hard to find at nurseries and garden centers. These shade tolerant succulents grow well in medium light or bright indirect sunlight with little water needed until the soil dries out completely then its needs an increase as summer temperatures rise.

Snake Plant is also easy to propagate, which means you can have plenty of new plants to give away or share with friends. Just remove a few leaves from the mother plant and place them in moist potting soil then wait for roots to sprout before planting each division separately.

It’s an ideal houseplant because it thrives on neglect by tolerating low light and infrequent watering. If you do water, make sure the soil is completely dry before adding more to prevent root rot or fungal problems.

Heartleaf (Haworthia)

shade tolerant succulents

This hardy succulent thrives in bright indirect sunlight but can tolerate some shade as well as little to no water for weeks at a time.

However, it can’t survive cold weather and needs to be brought indoors during the winter months in USDA hardiness zones 8 through 11. It’s also an excellent houseplant because its care requirements are so easy: Place Heartleaf where it will receive bright light all day long but avoid direct sunlight which leaves brown scorch marks on the plant’s leaves.

Water these shade tolerant succulents when the soil feels dry to touch but don’t overwater because too much moisture can cause root rot or fungal problems on leaves and stems, especially during the winter months when indoor air is often very humid.

Aloe vera

shade tolerant succulents

This popular medicinal plant needs bright light, although it will tolerate some shade for short periods of time. Water Aloe vera when the soil feels dry to touch and feed it with a liquid houseplant fertilizer every other week or so during the spring and summer months, following package instructions for dosage.

Aloe is easy to propagate: Just break off one of its succulent leaves, cut an inch from the bottom, and place it in moist potting soil. Keep it damp until new leaves sprout then transplant each division to its own container with fresh potting soil, spacing them about six inches apart.

These shade tolerant succulents are also known as an “edible” succulent that’s rich in vitamins A and C along with 18 other essential minerals such as calcium, magnesium, and potassium for immune system support and overall health.

Easter Cactus (Schlumbergera)

shade tolerant succulents

These popular shade tolerant succulents bloom when it’s time to celebrate Easter with pink or red flowers that have darker colored tips on the petals. It needs bright light all year long but avoid direct sunlight in the summer months when temperatures are at their highest and water only enough to prevent shriveling, which can cause root rot.

Easter Cactus is easy to propagate: Just break off a stem, remove lower leaves and cut an inch from the bottom of the plant then pot it in moist potting soil before keeping it damp until new branches sprout along with roots that will grow into a separate plant over time.

With proper care, Easter cactus can flower for up to six weeks.

Zebra Cactus (Haworthia fasciata)

shade tolerant succulents

These shade tolerant succulents thrive in bright indirect sunlight and need little water during winter months but will need more as summer temperatures rise. Water Zebra cactus when the soil feels dry to touch and feed it with a quarter-strength houseplant fertilizer every other week or so during spring and summer months, following package instructions for dosage.

Zebra cactus is easy to propagate: Just break off a stem, remove lower leaves and cut an inch from the bottom of the plant then pot it in moist potting soil before keeping it damp until new branches sprout along with roots that will grow into a separate plant over time.

Burro’s Tail (Sedum morganianum)

shade tolerant succulents

This wispy shade tolerant succulents plant with cascading stems and tiny green leaves atop pinkish-white stalks looks great hanging from a basket or spilling out of a pot. It thrives in bright indirect sunlight but can tolerate some shade as well as infrequent watering for short periods followed by more water after it soaks in.

However, Burro’s Tail succulent can’t survive cold weather and needs to be brought indoors during the winter months in USDA hardiness zones 8 through 11. It’s also an excellent houseplant because its care requirements are so easy: Place Sedum where it will receive bright light all day long but avoid direct sunlight which leaves brown scorch marks on the plant’s leaves.

Water the succulent when the soil feels dry to touch but don’t overwater because too much moisture can cause root rot or fungal problems on leaves and stems, especially during winter months when indoor air is often very humid.

String of Bananas (Senecio rowleyanus)

shade tolerant succulents

Also known as “String of Pearls” or a “Needlepoint,” these shade tolerant succulents leaves grow in rosettes that resemble bananas and can be yellow, green, or purple. It thrives in bright indirect sunlight but needs no water at all during the winter months when it rests because too much water will cause root rot.

The string of Banana succulents is easy to propagate: Just break off a leaf, remove lower leaves, and cut an inch from the bottom before potting it in moist potting soil where new branches sprout along with roots that grow into a separate plant over time. Keep it damp until new leaves appear then transplant each division into a separate pot.

String of Bananas needs bright indirect sunlight all year long but avoid direct sun, which can scorch leaves and stems; also keep it away from cold drafts that could cause brown leaf tips or damage the succulent’s growth. Water only when the soil feels dry to touch then soak in more water after it drains out from the bottom.

The string of Bananas can survive temperatures as low as 50 degrees Fahrenheit but should be brought indoors during winter months in USDA hardiness zones 8 through 11. It’s an excellent houseplant because its care requirements are so easy: Place the succulent where it will receive bright light all day long and keep the soil very slightly damp at all times.

Crown of Thorns (Euphorbia milii)

shade tolerant succulents

Crown of Thorns is a popular succulent because it’s easy to grow and thrives in bright indirect sunlight but can also survive shady conditions. It needs little water when kept dry during the winter months followed by more water once soil feels dry to touch, then soak in even more after draining out the bottom of the pot.

Crown of Thorns is a succulent that needs bright indirect sunlight all year round but avoids direct sun, which could scorch leaves and stems; also keep it away from cold drafts that can cause brown leaf tips or damage the plant’s growth. Water only when the soil feels dry to touch then soak in more water after draining out the bottom of the pot.

These shade tolerant succulents can survive temperatures as low as 40 degrees Fahrenheit but should be brought indoors during winter months in USDA hardiness zones 8 through 11; it’s also an excellent houseplant because its care requirements are so easy: Place Crown-of-Thorn succulent where it will receive bright light all day long and keep the soil slightly damp at all times.

Crown of Thorns can survive drought conditions but doesn’t like it when too much water sits in the pot bottom, so be sure to soak it well then let excess drain out afterward.

Ponytail Palm (Beaucarnea recurvata)

shade tolerant succulents

A Ponytail Palm succulent can live up to 100 years but tends to grow much faster when it receives adequate water and nourishment. It thrives in bright indirect sunlight, especially during winter months, keeping the soil slightly moist at all times while letting the top inch of soil dry out between waterings.

Ponytail Palm is easy to propagate by separating a leaf from the stem, cutting an inch off its bottom, and planting in moist potting soil where new roots sprout along with branches that grow into separate plants over time. Keep it damp until new leaves appear then transplant each division into their own pots.

Ponytail Palms should be kept in bright indirect sunlight all year long but avoid direct sun, which can scorch leaves and stems; also keep it away from cold drafts that could cause brown leaf tips or damage the succulent’s growth. Water only when the soil feels dry to touch then soak in more water after draining out the bottom of the pot.

Ponytail Palms can survive temperatures as low as 50 degrees Fahrenheit but should be brought indoors during winter months in USDA hardiness zones 8 through 11. It’s an excellent houseplant because its care requirements are so easy: Place the succulent where it will receive bright light all day long and keep the soil very slightly damp at all times.

Fox Tail Agave (Agave attenuata)

shade tolerant succulents

The Fox Tail Agave is a slow-growing succulent that’s perfect for beginning gardeners because it tolerates full sun or partial shade and cramped quarters with little water. It thrives in well-drained soil, which you should fertilize every few weeks during the spring and summer growing season.

Foxtail Agave can endure drought conditions but doesn’t like it when too much water sits in the pot bottom, so be sure to soak well then let excess drain out afterward.

Fox Tail Agaves grow best with full sun exposure during summer months followed by filtered sunlight or partial shade from autumn through spring; they also do better indoors where harsh winter weather could kill it.

Fox Tail Agaves should be brought indoors during winter months in USDA hardiness zones 8 through 11, where they’ll thrive as houseplants with bright indirect sunlight all day long and slightly moist soil at all times. They can survive drought conditions but don’t like it when too much water sits in the pot bottom, so be sure to soak well then let excess drain out afterward.

Bear Paws (Cotyledon tomentosa)

shade tolerant succulents

Bear Paw succulent can live up to 100 years but tends to grow much faster when it receives adequate water and nourishment. It thrives in bright indirect sunlight, especially during winter months, keeping soil slightly moist at all times while letting the top inch of soil dry out between waterings.

Bear Paw is easy to propagate by separating a leaf from the stem, cutting, an inch off its bottom, and planting in moist potting soil where new roots sprout along with branches that grow into separate plants over time. Keep it damp until new leaves appear, then transplant each division into its own pots.

Bear Paws should be kept in bright indirect sunlight all year long but avoid direct sun, which can scorch leaves and stems; also keep it away from cold drafts that could cause brown leaf tips or damage the succulent’s growth. Water only when soil feels dry to touch then soak in more water after draining out the bottom of the pot.

Bear Paws can survive temperatures as low as 50 degrees Fahrenheit but should be brought indoors during winter months in USDA hardiness zones 8 through 11. It’s an excellent houseplant because its care requirements are so easy: Place the succulent where it will receive bright light all day long and keep the soil very slightly damp at all times.

Panda Plant (Kalanchoe tomentosa)

shade tolerant succulents

The Panda Plant is a long-lived succulent that adds color and texture with its hairy leaves, which are greyish-green on top and silver underneath. Each rosette of the plant blooms in late winter or early spring with small pink flowers atop slender stalks that grow from each leaf base along the stem.

These shade tolerant succulents are easy to care for, tolerating drought conditions as long as the soil drains well but also thriving with regular watering and moist soil; it can grow several feet in one season during its active growth period, which lasts from early spring until autumn when temperatures start cooling off.

Panda Plants thrive in bright indirect sunlight and can survive in cooler temperatures, although they tend to grow much faster when it receives adequate water and nourishment. They’re excellent for container gardens and make interesting houseplants because of how easy they are to care for: Place the succulent where it will receive bright light all day long and keep the soil very slightly damp at all times.

Jade Plant (Crassula ovata)

shade tolerant succulents

The Jade Plant is a succulent prized for its lush green leaves, which become red-edged when stressed by high heat or drought conditions. This slow-growing plant blooms only after several years of maturing and produces small white flowers on tall slender stalks that grow from the center of each rosette along the stem.

Jade Plant thrives in bright indirect sunlight and can survive temperatures as low as 40 degrees Fahrenheit but should be brought indoors during winter months in USDA hardiness zones 8 through 11; it’s an excellent houseplant because its care requirements are so easy: Place the succulent where it will receive bright light all day long and keep the soil slightly damp at all times.

These shade tolerant succulents are popular plant with an interesting history: In the 1700s, sailors from China introduced it to England where they used it as ballast in their ships because of its ability to survive long periods without water; there are several legends surrounding how this led to newer varieties being developed over time and how some of these hybrids eventually made it to the United States where they became popular houseplants.

Flaming Katy (Kalanchoe blossfeldiana)

shade tolerant succulents

These shade tolerant succulents are prized for its colorful foliage, which includes pink or red edges along with each dark green leaf. Each rosette of the plant blooms in late winter with small tubular yellow flowers that look like they have flames rising from their centers and stems. The leaves themselves also have a pattern that looks like flames.

Flaming Katy thrives in bright indirect sunlight and can survive temperatures as low as 40 degrees Fahrenheit but should be brought indoors during winter months in USDA hardiness zones 8 through 11; it’s an excellent houseplant because its care requirements are so easy: Place the succulent where it will receive bright light all day long and keep soil slightly damp at all times.

Flaming Katy is a great plant for those who want color but don’t have much room to work with: It’s excellent as a hanging plant because the flowers trail downward, creating cascading vines that cascade over the side of its container or any nearby surfaces such as ledges or shelves. It’s also a good container plant because it doesn’t have large roots that fill its pot quickly and make the soil difficult to water; instead, you can simply place Flaming Katy in a decorative hanging basket or on top of any surface where it won’t be disturbed as often.

String of Pearls (Curio rowleyanus)

shade tolerant succulents

The String of Pearls is a succulent prized for its long narrow leaves that are covered in tiny hairs which makes them look somewhat furry. Each rosette blooms in late winter with small white flowers arranged along the stalk-like pearls on a string. The plant spreads by slowly sending out runners from the base of each rosette.

String of Pearls thrives in bright indirect sunlight and can survive temperatures as low as 40 degrees Fahrenheit but should be brought indoors during winter months in USDA hardiness zones 8 through 11; it’s an excellent houseplant because its care requirements are so easy: Place the succulent where it will receive bright light all day long and keep the soil slightly damp at all times.

String of Pearls is a great plant for those who want color but don’t have much room to work with: It’s excellent as a hanging plant because the flowers trail downward, creating cascading vines that cascade over the side of its container or any nearby surfaces such as ledges or shelves. These shade tolerant succulents are also a good container plant because they don’t have large roots that fill their pot quickly and make the soil difficult to water; instead, you can simply place String of Pearls in a decorative hanging basket or on top of any surface where it won’t be disturbed as often.

Kiwi Aeonium (Aeonium Kiwi)

shade tolerant succulents

The kiwi aeonium is an unusual succulent plant prized for its unique green and red variegated foliage that looks somewhat like the skin of a kiwi fruit. Each rosette sends out runners which will eventually turn into another set of plants if they are allowed to spread; otherwise, you can remove the runners from their parent plant to propagate a single kiwi aeonium into several.

Kiwi Aeonium thrives in bright indirect sunlight and can survive temperatures as low as 40 degrees Fahrenheit but should be brought indoors during winter months in USDA hardiness zones 8 through 11; it’s an excellent houseplant because its care requirements are so easy: Place the succulent where it will receive bright light all day long and keep soil slightly damp at all times.

These shade tolerant succulents are an excellent choice if you want color but don’t have much room to work with: They are ideal as hanging plants because the flowers trail downward, creating cascading vines that cascade over the side of its container or any nearby surfaces such as ledges or shelves. It’s also a good container plant because it doesn’t have large roots that fill its pot quickly and make the soil difficult to water; instead, you can simply place kiwi aeonium in a decorative hanging basket or on top of any surface where it won’t be disturbed as often.

Spider Agave (Agave bracteosa)

Agave bracteosa

The spider agave is a fascinating plant prized for its long, pointed leaves that resemble those of an aloe vera. Each rosette will eventually send out runners which can be removed from the parent plant to propagate a single spider agave into several; if allowed to spread, it may produce dozens of tiny offshoots along the stem.

Spider agave thrives in bright indirect sunlight and can survive temperatures as low as 40 degrees Fahrenheit but should be brought indoors during winter months in USDA hardiness zones eight through 11; it’s an excellent houseplant because its care requirements are so easy: Place the succulent where it will receive bright light all day long and keep the soil slightly damp at all times.

These shade tolerant succulents are great plants for those who want color but don’t have much room to work with: It’s excellent as a hanging plant because the flowers trail downward, creating cascading vines that cascade over the side of its container or any nearby surfaces such as ledges or shelves. It’s also a good container plant because it doesn’t have large roots that fill its pot quickly and make the soil difficult to water; instead, you can simply place spider agave in a decorative hanging basket or on top of any surface where it won’t be disturbed as often.

Devil’s Backbone (Euphorbia tithymaloides)

shade tolerant succulents

The devil’s backbone is an unusual succulent prized for its unique branching pattern of variegated leaves. Each rosette will eventually send out runners which can be removed from the parent plant to propagate a single devil’s backbone into several, although it may take years before your little cuttings grow into mature plants; if allowed to spread, it may produce dozens of tiny offshoots along the stem.

These shade tolerant succulents thrive in bright indirect sunlight and can survive temperatures as low as 40 degrees Fahrenheit but should be brought indoors during winter months in USDA hardiness zones eight through 11; it’s an excellent houseplant because its care requirements are so easy: Place the succulent where it will receive bright light all day long and keep soil slightly damp at all times.

The devil’s backbone is an excellent plant for those who want color but don’t have much room to work with: It’s ideal as a hanging plant because the flowers trail downward, creating cascading vines that cascade over the side of its container or any nearby surfaces such as ledges or shelves. It’s also a good container plant because it doesn’t have large roots that fill its pot quickly and make the soil difficult to water; instead, you can simply place devil’s backbone in a decorative hanging basket or on top of any surface where it won’t be disturbed as often.


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